Aston Martin Vantage Review logo

Aston Martin Vantage Review

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heycar review

      Launch year
      2018
      Body type
      Performance
      Fuel type
      Petrol
heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

00/10
heycar rating
“Thrilling, overtly sporting Aston Martin ”

Best bits

  • Huge performance from a character-rich drivetrain
  • Agile and entertaining in the bends
  •  Surprisingly practical, with a decent (for class) sized boot and a hatchback to access it

Not so great

  • The interior is a bit fussy in its style and operation
  • Not quite as naturally beautiful as its predecessor
  • Infotainment is old tech and there’s no Apple CarPlay availability

Read by

Aston Martin Vantage Exterior Side Front

Overall verdict

Aston Martin Vantage Interior

On the inside

Aston Martin Vantage Driving Front

Driving

Aston Martin Vantage Driving Back

How much does it cost to run

Aston Martin Vantage Driving Side

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"A brilliant, engaging and enjoyable sports car, with huge performance and a distinctive, atelier feel that Aston Martin excels at. The pugnacious styling might be more divisive than the clear beauty of its predecessor, but it’s striking, confident and far less traditional. Add some genuine usability and the Vantage is a very strong contender in its rarefied marketplace. Brilliant to drive, bold to look at, the Vantage is a special car."

Aston Martin Vantage Exterior Side Front

The previous Aston Martin Vantage was a popular sports car, being built for 12 years until it was replaced in 2018 by this all-new model.

It shocked, for a number of reasons, and not just the overt, bold style it introduced, but also the way it drove. For all the predecessor’s obvious beauty, it always felt behind its rivals in the driving stakes, but with this Vantage that changed. 


The Vantage is now a far more dynamic, engaging and enjoyable car, with a not inconsiderable 510PS output from its twin turbocharged 4.0-litre V8 producing huge performance.. 


That is crucial, as in the lengthy production run of its predecessor the sports car market accelerated, rapidly. Entry-level sports cars like the Vantage now expected to have performance that a decade or so back would have left you wide-eyed and slack-jawed in a supercar. 


The Vantage delivers, with a 0-62mph time of 3.6 seconds and a 195mph potential top speed. Impressive numbers, for a car that’s the entry-point to Aston Martin ownership, but then they need to be to compete with the broad church that spans its rivals that might be vying for a potential Vantage buyer’s money. 


That competition includes the omnipresent Porsche 911 in highly specified Carrera S and GTS guises, as well as the 911 Turbo, Audi R8, Ferrari 488 GTB, Honda NSX, Mercedes-AMG GTS, McLaren 570C and Lamborghini Huracan. Like most of these rivals the Vantage can be had in convertible, open-topped guise, as the Vantage Roadster, losing the roof adding around £2000 to the coupe’s price. 


Built from aluminium and assembled largely by hand at Aston Martin’s UK factory, the Vantage oozes in indulgent, low-volume appeal. It will never sell in the same numbers as most of its rivals, that relative rarity a huge part of its appeal. 


It’s a very considered choice among some more obvious competition and one you’re likely to have taken a good while reaching. The Vantage is a car that feels and looks very special indeed. 


A new Vantage can be utterly unique to its owner, as Aston Martin offers an incredible choice of options to personalise a car. Virtually every surface inside or out can be optioned, whether that’s the technical racy look of carbon fibre, outrageous eye-popping colour choices of paint, leather and fabric choices, or something more restrained and traditional. It means no two are likely to be the same but also means that you may have to learn to live with someone else’s taste when buying used. 


It’s not cheap, indeed, the circa £125,000 list price is really just a starting point and we’d be amazed if a Vantage has ever been sold for less than £140,000. Many will roll out of the factory costing considerably more. That’s not unusual in this class, indeed, it’s welcomed by the owners, who are used to having exactly what they want. 


Aston Martin added the AMR (Aston Martin Racing) model to its line-up in 2019. It’s a lighter, more focused version aimed at enthusiastic drivers. Its key addition was a manual transmission, which Aston Martin has subsequently added to the entire Vantage range, a manual gearbox an unusual, though welcome option in this class of car. 


Is the Aston Martin Vantage right for you?

It’s improbable that you’ll jump straight from owing something ordinary into an Aston Martin Vantage. Your garage floor will have undoubtedly had some wide rubber attached to some desirable cars parked on it.


It’s almost certain you’ve owned a Porsche 911 (too common), a Ferrari 488 GTB (too showy) or a Jaguar F-Type (too unreliable) among a host of other cars on your route to Aston Martin ownership. If there’s not an iconic classic British sports car, an E-Type or suchlike, squirrelled away in your big garage we’d be amazed, too. 


If that’s the case, the Vantage is very much the right car for you, the brawny Aston Martin might not have the rear ‘seats’ of the 911, but it’s got a decent-sized boot. It’s not too far off that Ferrari for performance either. And thanks to an engine borrowed from Mercedes-AMG, it should prove more reliable than that Jaguar. 


Is the Aston Martin Vantage right for you? Hell yes it is, it’s right for everyone, assuming you can afford it, of course.  


What’s the best Aston Martin Vantage model/engine to choose?

There’s only really one trim, that being the one that the original buyer created with the configurator and the Aston Martin salesperson at the dealership. The AMR, with its 200 series model run, has sold out, though its legacy is now that you can have a regular Vantage with the seven-speed manual transmission instead of the eight-speed paddle-shifted automatic. 


You have two choices then, manual or automatic, and open or closed roofs. We’d have a manual coupe, as for all the awkwardness of the manual’s shift, that challenge means it’s a joy to drive, and coupe because we simply prefer them to open-topped cars. 


That said, you’d be entirely correct to buy a paddle-shifted Roadster, as, really, there’s no incorrect choice here. You may have to endure someone else’s terrible mistakes when it comes to colour and trim decisions, though.   


What other cars are similar to the Aston Martin Vantage?

The most obvious, and common rival, for any car in this class is the Porsche 911 Carrera. They’re everywhere, for good reason, but that’s also a good reason to buy a Vantage instead. The closest car in concept is something like Jaguar’s F-Type in its most powerful forms, though even so specified you’ll be a big number away in price from the expensive Aston Martin. 


You don’t reach Aston Martin Vantage ownership without having owned at least a handful of its rivals, and, perhaps, some other Aston Martin models, the DB11, for example. If you’re at this point, then similar cars to the Vantage aren’t likely to sway your decision, not least because it’s highly probable you still own them as well.  


Learn more

Aston Martin Vantage Interior

On the inside

Aston Martin Vantage Driving Front

Driving

Aston Martin Vantage Driving Back

How much does it cost to run

Aston Martin Vantage Driving Side

Prices, versions and specification