Audi Q2 Review logo

Audi Q2 Review

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heycar review

      Launch year
      2016
      Body type
      Crossover
      Fuel type
      Petrol, Diesel
heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

00/10
heycar rating
“Desirable, stylish, small crossover”

Best bits

  • Frugal front-drive models
  • Sharper to drive than most small crossovers
  • Wide range of strong engines

Not so great

  • Base trims lack kit
  • Costlier than many rivals
  • Firm ride in town

Read by

Audi Q2 Exterior Side

Overall verdict

Audi Q2 Interior Side

On the inside

Audi Q2 Exterior Back

Driving

Audi Q2 Exterior Side

How much does it cost to run

Audi Q2 Boot

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict on the Audi Q2

"The Audi Q2 is a premium alternative to small crossover SUVs like the Nissan Juke and Peugeot 2008. It costs a little more than its mainstream competitors, but offers a stylish exterior design, classy and functional interior, and a broad range of engines and drivetrain options. It's not the most practical or affordable though."

Audi Q2 Exterior Side

Underneath the metal, the Audi Q2 is based on the old A3 hatchback, and comes with five doors, and a choice of two or four-wheel drive, six-speed manual and seven-speed automatic gearboxes. It shares its sibling's minimal, stylish cabin and expensive-feeling materials, although the standard equipment list is a little on the stingy side.


There are four different trims; Technik, Sport, S line and Black Edition. Technik models seem to cover most essentials, with a powered tailgate, air conditioning, cruise control, rear parking sensors, and DAB. Our issue is with how much of the best equipment missing. Even on the top two trims you need to pay extra for climate control and a large infotainment screen, the latter only available as part of a very expensive Technology Package.


Entry-level versions are front-wheel drive, kicking off with a 1.0-litre three-cylinder with 115PS. Move up and you get a 1.5-litre with 150PS, and a choice of transmissions. They're badged as 30 and 35 TFSI. The latter will be the best choice for most buyers, with reasonable running costs and smooth, flexible performance.


On the diesel side, there are two options, a 1.6-litre with 115PS called the 30 TDI, or a 2.0-litre with 150bhp that comes as standard with quattro four-wheel drive and an automatic gearbox, the 35 TDI. Both are quiet cruisers with strong pulling power, although they don't manage to match the petrol's for refinement in town.


At the top of the range is the high-performance SQ2, which features bespoke sporty styling, a 300PS petrol engine, and serious turn of speed. It can keep up with several sports cars, and costs as much as one too.


Regardless of the model you pick, all Q2s are sharp to drive, with tidy handling, quick steering, and tight body control. They feel composed and stable on country roads, and body roll is minimal, but the stiff springs mean it's not as comfortable as some rivals on poorly surfaced roads, especially with larger alloy wheels.


The front seats are very accommodating, and we like the logical layout of the dash. Everything you interact with is simple to understand, and there are plenty of storage spots for keeping the cabin free of clutter. The boot has some clever functionality, and can carry a surprising amount thanks to its flat-sided, wide shape.


However for carrying people, whether that's four or five adults, or two parents and kids in child seats, the Q2 is not even in the same league as rivals like the MINI Countryman, Volvo XC40 and BMW X1. Its cramped for head and knee room, and too narrow to sit three across for anything more than nipping to the shops.


When it comes to premium brands, small doesn't necessarily equal cheap, but the Q2 feels like not a lot of car for quite a lot of money. While it's possible to make it really luxurious, you pay through the nose to do so.


Is the Audi Q2 right for you?

The Q2 is on the small side (even for a bite-size crossover) and its cute dimensions are a blessing and a curse. It's small enough to never feel intimidating to drive, so it will be great for buyers who want a raised-up driving experience but don't want to feel like they are driving a cumbersome, lumbering off-roader.


It's easy to drive on congested city streets and a doozy to park, and Audi has managed to give it a decent size boot considering its small footprint. Where you pay the penalty is in the cramped rear seats. So if you have teenage kids, regularly want have four adults on long journeys, or need a little flexibility, the Q2 ain't it.


Its polished driving experience is a major plus, but it doesn't feel fun, just neat and tidy, with predictable handling and fine body control thanks to firm suspension. A Ford Puma will put a bigger smile on your face.


What's the best Audi Q2 model/engine to choose?

With a fairly aggressive pricing strategy that sees the Q2 stack up against some seven-seat SUVs in the top trim levels, we think it's better to stick to the lower end of the spectrum, with a front-wheel drive petrol model.


The entry-level 1.0-litre 30 TFSI is chirpy enough to potentially be all the car you really need, it feels light on its toes and is fun to drive, but will struggle to perform once the car is fully laden with people and luggage.


So for us, the pick of the engine range is the 1.5-litre 35 TFSI petrol, with smoother performance, responsive in-gear acceleration, and excellent cruising refinement. Keep your right foot in check, and its also capable of returning over 40mpg, so everyday running costs are only marginally higher than in the less powerful model.


It's worth going for the Sport trim so that you at least have the option to upgrade the infotainment system - if you don't then your Q2 will start to date pretty quickly.


What other cars are similar to the Audi Q2?

If you are just looking for a compact crossover with a posh badge, then the Mercedes-Benz GLA is very similar to the Q2. Both are based on a big-selling family hatchback, but as of 2019 it comes with petrol power alone.


However if you want genuine load-lugging ability and space for four adults, the MINI Countryman and Volvo XC40 are a lot more spacious in the back. Each can squeeze in an extra 50 litres of carrying capacity too. True, they are both bigger cars overall, but have premium interiors that come close to matching the Audi for quality, and are available as plug-in hybrid models with very low running costs and zero-emissions capability.


If you don't care about brand snobbery, the Peugeot 2008 is even more stylish than the Q2, and available as a pure EV, while its siblings like the Skoda Karoq, SEAT Arona and Volkswagen T-Roc feature the same engine range for less cash.


Learn more

Audi Q2 Interior Side

On the inside

Audi Q2 Exterior Back

Driving

Audi Q2 Exterior Side

How much does it cost to run

Audi Q2 Boot

Prices, versions and specification

Ask the heycar experts: common questions

What is the Audi Q2?

The Q2 is the smallest, most affordable SUV in the Audi line-up, but despite having a lower price it offers a smart interior, the option of quattro four-wheel drive, and a hot SQ2 version.

Dan Powell

Answered by

Dan Powell

Is the Audi Q2 any good?

The Q2 is the brand’s least expensive SUV, and it gives buyers access to Audi’s impressive cabin design and wide engine range at a lower price, but it’s not as practical as some rivals.

Keith Moody

Answered by

Keith Moody

What is the difference between the Audi Q2 and Q3?

The Q2 sits below the Q3 in the range, so it’s smaller inside and out, and a fair bit cheaper too. Both come with the option of two or four-wheel drive and manual and auto gearboxes.

Dan Powell

Answered by

Dan Powell

What insurance group is the Audi Q2?

The Q2 range has a broad spread of insurance costs. The cheapest to get cover for is the 1.0-litre TFSI SE, which sits in group 13. The majority of the range falls between this and group 30, but the high-performance SQ2 Vorsprung flagship sits all the way up in group 39.

David Ross

Answered by

David Ross

How much boot space does the Q2 have?

SUVs are supposed to be more practical than standard hatchbacks, and with 405 litres of boot space the Q2 is marginally larger than the A3 Sportback. Still, that space is a fair bit less than that of the MINI Countryman, and it doesn’t have the flexibility of sliding rear seats.

Russ Campbell

Answered by

Russ Campbell