Audi TT Review logo

Audi TT Review

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heycar review

      Launch year
      2014
      Body type
      Coupe
      Fuel type
      Petrol, Diesel
heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

00/10
heycar rating
“Highly desirable and accomplished coupe”

Best bits

  • High quality interior 
  • Easy and fun to drive
  • Very practical for a coupe

Not so great

  • Navigation is a pricey option
  • Cramped rear seats 
  • Firm ride on larger wheels

Read by

Audi TT Exterior Front

Overall verdict

Audi TT Interior

On the inside

Audi TT Driving

Driving

Audi TT Rear Bumper

How much does it cost to run

Audi TT Boot

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"As a package, the Audi TT is one of the best coupes on the market. Its sporty image and classy interior are matched by a highly polished driving experience, but we do wish it was better equipped as standard."

Audi TT Exterior Front

Now into its third incarnation, the Audi TT has filled out a little over the years. The current car has the aggressive, angular styling from elsewhere in the range, but it's lighter and more aerodynamic too.


The TT features a fantastic driver-oriented interior that sets the class benchmark for quality, with an uncluttered dash and a 12.3-inch digital instrument display that places the media and drive settings right in your eye-line. The plush materials and impressive build quality are Audi hallmarks, but it's also roomy and neatly laid out. 


Under the skin, it shares a lot of its components with the humdrum hatchbacks like the Volkswagen Golf, but that shared DNA also makes the TT a very practical choice, with two small rear seats, and a generous boot. You're unlikely to carry four passengers often, but being able to fold that rear bench to free up luggage space means you can fit a whole lot more into this compact sports car that you would in a more focused two-seater.


Its desirability has never been in doubt, but the latest TT has also evolved into a great car to drive. It has fun but secure handling, with precise steering and strong grip; feeling nimble and responsive on a twisty road. This newfound driver focus hasn't come at the expense of usability though. All of the engines are impressively refined at low speeds, visibility is good, and although the ride is firm, it's comfortable enough for longer trips.


Most of the range is powered by a 2.0-litre TFSI turbo petrol engine, with between 197PS and 306PS. The flagship TT RS coupe features a ballistically quick 2.5-litre TFSI five-cylinder, but we've reviewed this model separately.


The range was simplified in 2018 following a facelift. Tighter emissions regulations put an end to the 1.8 TFSI petrol and popular 2.0 TDI diesel model. That means the entry-level car now has the same engine capacity as the high-performance TTS, but drives just its front wheels through a dual-clutch automatic transmission.


Picking the mid-range 45 TFSI brings a wider set of choices. A six-speed manual gearbox is standard, with the S tronic automatic transmission and quattro four-wheel drive both optional; TTs with both are very quick. Fuel economy is excellent across the board - you'll be able to return 40mpg if you drive carefully enough.


The Audi TT is an attractive coupe that backs up its sharp looks and high-quality interior with a fun driving experience that mixes stable, grippy handling with refined cruising manners and brisk performance. A lovely object that demands few compromises from its owner, it's only weakness is a poor kit count and high price.


If you're looking for the convertible version, you need our Audi TT Roadster (2015-) review while the high performance version is covered in our Audi TT RS (2016-) review.


Is the Audi TT right for you?

The Audi TT is about having your cake and eating it too. This is a sports car that says you can have the looks, performance and luxury of a coupe, without the drawbacks of high running costs, and poor practicality.


It's smaller and lighter than many of its rivals, so it's a doddle to drive around town and park, but also refined and comfortable enough inside to drive every single day, no matter how long your commute to the office is. 


Having four seats and a flexible boot means it can moonlight as a family hatchback (just) when required, yet it remains great fun to drive, with sure-footed handling, positive controls, and a range of fast petrol engines. Combine these qualities with its relatively low running costs, and you've got a brilliant all-round package. We suspect that owning a TT would be as hassle-free as having a sports car gets, so what's the catch then? 


Well, the mature driving experience it delivers robs the TT of some of the drama and excitement that sports car buyers want, and its rivals that are rougher round the edges do feel more memorable to drive as a result. If you want a coupe as your only car the TT is a compelling choice, but it might leave the keenest drivers unfulfilled.





What’s the best Audi TT model/engine to choose?

Audi has refined the driving experience in the TT to the point that every model in the line-up feels the same. The only real difference between an entry-level 40 TFSI and the all-singing TTS is how fast the numbers move. Both cars share the approachable handling, sharp responses and accurate steering that make the TT so confidence inspiring on an unfamiliar road, but the four-wheel drive car just grips a little harder in the turns.


As a result, we think the entry-level car - with its 197PS output and front-wheel drive - is the one to go for. It's fun to drive, and feels plenty fast, but it's also the cheapest to buy, own and insure, making it excellent value. If you want the meaner styling and figure-hugging seats in the S line model then it's a sensible upgrade from the basic Sport, but bear in mind you'll still need to pay for sat-nav, climate control and front parking sensors.


The 45 TFSI is the only TT with a manual gearbox. However, you can't combine shifting gears yourself with Audi's quattro four-wheel drive system - it's one or the other - and the automatic gearbox is effective but dull.


With its fancy adaptive suspension, highly-tuned 306PS engine and generous standard equipment levels, a TTS takes the standard car's winning formula and adds a much pinch of spice, but it's also quite expensive.


What other cars are similar to the Audi TT?

If you're in the market for sporty coupe there's no shortage of options, but few feel as well polished as the TT. Premium buyers who want similar levels of practicality and a roomier cabin (but also a six-cylinder engine and rear-drive excitement) will be well served by a BMW 2 Series Coupe in M240i trim, it's a fine all-rounder.


The Ford Mustang is an altogether different beast. It's hugely charismatic - especially with a V8 engine - with feisty handling, but also deeply flawed, with a cheap feeling cabin and ruinously high fuel costs.


If your budget is a little lower, but you still want a fun driving experience and a manual gearbox, the Toyota GT86 and Mazda's folding hard-top MX-5 RF will fit the bill; but neither is as refined or well built as the Audi.


Several high-performance hot hatches can match the straight-line speed and tenacious four-wheel drive grip of a TTS, but it competes closer with mid-engined two-seaters such as the Porsche Cayman and Alpine A110.


Learn more

Audi TT Interior

On the inside

Audi TT Driving

Driving

Audi TT Rear Bumper

How much does it cost to run

Audi TT Boot

Prices, versions and specification

Ask the heycar experts: common questions

What does the ‘TT’ in the name stand for?

A common mistake is thinking these letters stand for ‘Technology & Tradition’ but it actually refers to a famous motorbike race held on the Isle of Man - the Tourist Trophy.

Russ Campbell

Answered by

Russ Campbell

What is the difference between the TT convertible and the coupe?

Apart from the number of seats (two in the convertible, four in the coupe) the convertible costs a little more, has a smaller boot and is also a little heavier, but they share engines.

Dan Powell

Answered by

Dan Powell

Which version of the TT comes with quattro four-wheel drive?

Like all high-performance Audis, the TT S and TT RS have four-wheel drive as standard. On the normal version, it’s offered as an optional extra on the more powerful automatic version.

David Ross

Answered by

David Ross

Isn’t there a diesel version of the TT?

There used to be, but the 2.0 TDI was discontinued in 2018. It wasn’t as exciting to drive or quiet as the petrols, but it was very economical, and capable of returning 60mpg.

Andy Brady

Answered by

Andy Brady