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Bentley Flying Spur Review

Bentley Flying Spur
Bentley Flying Spur
Bentley Flying Spur
Bentley Flying Spur
Bentley Flying Spur
Bentley Flying Spur
Bentley Flying Spur
Bentley Flying Spur
Bentley Flying Spur
Bentley Flying Spur
Bentley Flying Spur

1/10

Bentley Flying Spur

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Bentley Flying Spur

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Bentley Flying Spur

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Bentley Flying Spur

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Bentley Flying Spur

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Bentley Flying Spur

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Bentley Flying Spur

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Bentley Flying Spur

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Bentley Flying Spur

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1 / 10

heycar review

      Launch year
      2013
      Body type
      Luxury
      Fuel type
      Petrol
heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

00/10
heycar rating
Luxury and speed finely balanced

Best bits

  • Graceful image
  • Considerable turn of speed
  • Sublime cabin

Not so great

  • Sometimes firm ride
  • W12’s running costs
  • Driving position adjustment

Read by

Bentley Flying Spur Exterior Front

Overall verdict

Bentley Flying Spur Interior

On the inside

Bentley Flying Spur Driving Front

Driving

Bentley Flying Spur Exterior Back

How much does it cost to run

Bentley Flying Spur Exterior

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"Few brands hold the same appeal and caché as Bentley. That famous winged badge has always been associated with opulence and performance, which is an image the brand continues to enjoy. Few manufacturers have such a rich heritage and very few make cars in the same way Bentley does with so much still completed by hand rather than robot."

Bentley Flying Spur Exterior Front

The second-generation Continental Flying Spur is unmistakably a Bentley, with large, round twin-headlights and purposeful yet understated styling. It’s got the power it needs to be a true Bentley, too – the 6.0-litre W12 produces 625PS and 800Nm of torque. That’s sufficient for a 200mph top speed and a 0-60mph sprint of 4.3 seconds.


Of course, even Bentley has to cede to the modern world and this is why a twin-turbo 4.0-litre V8 engine joined the range in early 2014. It’s more frugal by comparison with its 12-cylinder sister yet you could hardly call 0-62mph in 5.2 seconds and a 183mph top speed slow.


All models have all-wheel drive and are fitted with a ZF eight-speed automatic transmission. Improvements have been made to fuel economy over the first-generation model, but don’t expect frugality as a combined cycle economy is 19.2mpg and emissions are 343g/km for the W12 mean you need deep pockets to fund this upscale saloon.


The cabin is as sumptuous as you’d expect with soft leather, seat heating and ventilation for all occupants, and there’s lots of seat adjustment to maximise comfort. All of the wood veneer, which amounts to almost 10-square metres per car, is hand-crafted and seven variations are offered. Of course, customers could also indulge in any finish they like were they prepared to dig even further into their wallets.


The Flying Spur is offered in four- or five-seat form. The former features an extra storage area with a stowage case trimmed in veneer to match the interior of the car. There are electronically operated rear privacy blinds fitted as standard to both versions of the Continental Flying Spur.


It’s not all traditional, though. There’s an 8-inch touchscreen with sat nav, voice control and Bluetooth. Rear seat passengers can control the touchscreen with a remote, while hard workers can specify a Bentley Connectivity Unit, which adds 10-inch screens to the rear headrests and web-connectivity.


The Flying Spur really is a special car and one that's a pleasure to drive or be lucky enough to be driven in. It’s the only real alternative to a Rolls-Royce Phantom but still manages to be more engaging and fun to drive than its equally famous British rival.


It is, of course, a very expensive luxury and that’s just the purchase price. Running costs will require a steady input of funds for fuel, road tax and servicing. Even so, there are plenty of less expensive limousine-like models out there, but nothing can hold a candle to the Bentley. It really is in a class of its own.


Is the Bentley Continental Flying Spur right for you?

For those fortunate enough to be in the position of considering a Bentley Continental Flying Spur as their car, there is very little in the way of competition for your attention. The only real contender is the Rolls-Royce Phantom, which is a very different type of luxury car to the more driver-focused Bentley.


So, the Bentley is ideal for those who want to enjoy long-distance travel in the lap of luxury and take three or four others along for the jaunt. The cabin is discreetly packed with all of the opulence and technology you’ll ever need, while the boot is more than big enough for holiday luggage.


The Flying Spur is also a fine way to conduct daily driving duties, though you will have to bear in mind its sheer size when looking for parking spaces and trickling through densely packed city streets.


What’s the best Bentley Continental Flying Spur model/engine to choose?

There is only really one major decision to make when choosing a second-generation Bentley Continental Flying Spur and that’s which engine to go for. There will be some who will only consider the top of the line W12 for its undeniably silky smooth performance and effortless pace, even when pushing past 150mph on an autobahn.


However, the twin-turbo 4.0-litre V8 engine is also creamily svelte and makes a wonderfully cultured growl when pressed hard. Admittedly, it’s not quite as quick off the mark as the W12, but this is more because the 12-cylinder model is just so fast. As a result, the 4.0-litre Flying Spur is the one to go for in our book as you get all of the best bits of this car with running costs that have at least a foothold in the real world.


Those costs matter when comparing the W12’s 19.2mpg combined economy with the 25.9mpg of the V8. It also matters when servicing the V8 is significantly cheaper too as it all adds up.


What other cars are similar to the Bentley Continental Flying Spur?

The only real alternative to the Bentley Continental Flying Spur is the Rolls-Royce Phantom. The Rolls errs even further towards ultimate luxury with its massive rear legroom and lofty driving position, so it’s one for people who want to be chauffeured rather than drive themselves.


Mercedes Maybach range gets close to the Bentley in concept and equipment, but it doesn’t quite deliver the same regal image. Nor do any of the most highly specified saloons like the the Audi A8, BMW 7 Series, Maserati Quattroporte or Porsche Panamera.


Learn more

Bentley Flying Spur Interior

On the inside

Bentley Flying Spur Driving Front

Driving

Bentley Flying Spur Exterior Back

How much does it cost to run

Bentley Flying Spur Exterior

Prices, versions and specification

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