BMW 5 Series Touring (2010-2017) Review logo

BMW 5 Series Touring (2010-2017) Review

Car image
Car image
Car image
Car image
Car image
Car image
Car image
Car image
Car image
Car image
Car image

1/10

Car image

2/10

Car image

3/10

Car image

4/10

Car image

5/10

Car image

6/10

Car image

7/10

Car image

8/10

Car image

9/10

Car image

10/10

1 / 10

heycar review

      Launch year
      2010
      Body type
      Estate
      Fuel type
      Petrol, Diesel
heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

00/10
heycar rating
“Practical, economical enjoyable premium estate”

Best bits

  •  Excellent to drive
  • Practical load bay
  • Smart styling and interior

Not so great

  • Early cars don’t have standard sat-nav
  • Rivals beat it for luggage space
  • Desirable M Sport versions cost more

Read by

BMW 5 Series Touring Driving

Overall verdict

BMW 5 Series Touring Interior

On the inside

BMW 5 Series Touring Driving Back

Driving

BMW 5 Series Touring Driving Side

How much does it cost to run

BMW 5 Series Touring Driving

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"The BMW 5 Series Touring is a fantastic estate car with the added appeal of affordable second-hand prices. It still looks modern – and feels it inside – and has a well-sized boot, engines that combine power and economy, plus the dynamics and feelgood drive you’d expect from a BMW."

BMW 5 Series Touring Driving

The 5 Series Touring offers the same all-round excellence as the BMW 5 Series saloon, but with one important added extra – a much larger and much more practical boot. The BMW’s direct rivals in this sector may be roomier still, but no alternative delivers an overall drive as impressive as the 5 Series.


The Touring’s launch closely followed the roll-out of the saloon in 2010. The model line-up was similar, focused on core SE and M Sport models, with a broad range of engines that included some powerful diesels. Four-cylinder diesels were the core models, plus there were also some very desirable six-cylinder engines – and even a V8 range-topper.


The fuel economy and power of the four-cylinder 520d made it by far the most popular variant. Buyers didn’t feel short-changed by not having a larger-engined version, as response to the accelerator was surprisingly surging and noise wasn’t excessive either. Then there’s the outstanding efficiency: better than many smaller cars. A special EfficientDynamics version was best of all, averaging an outstanding 60mpg.


The 5 Series was facelifted in summer 2013. These cars had updated engines that were even more efficient. Now, every regular 520d emitted 119g/km, meaning the EfficientDynamics version was no longer needed, and it was discontinued. The iDrive infotainment system was improved and the interior lifted with more chrome detailing. Spot a facelifted 5 Series from its more jewel-like headlights and indicators in the door mirrors, rather than the front wings.


All models feel sophisticated inside, even today. The 5 Series before this one was a bit stark and upright inside, and has aged badly. This car has a more open-plan and sophisticated look, crowned by that iDrive infotainment setup and finished with high-end trims throughout. It feels a very commanding car to drive.


Practicality is why you might consider it today alongside a more mainstream family car. The boot offers 560 litres of space with the seats up, extending to nearly 1,700 litres with them folded. Packing in the kids’ bikes will be child’s play, and even teenagers will find rear-seat space impressive. The Touring is a much more practical car than the 5 Series saloon, that’s for sure.


Our favourite trim is M Sport. This combines all the 5 Series’ core strengths with very desirable styling upgrades, including bigger alloy wheels, sportier bumpers and M-branded interior fixtures and fittings. That’s not to say value-priced SE models should be ignored, though, as even they feel like proper luxury cars, with a generous amount of standard equipment.


This generation of BMW 5 Series Touring is a brilliantly capable all-rounder that’s more family-friendly than the saloon and therefore has further enhanced appeal on the used car market. Prices are becoming ever more affordable, too. Here are the essentials you need to know.


If you're looking for the newer version, you need our BMW 5 Series Touring (2017-) review.


Is the BMW 5 Series Touring right for you?

In terms of practicality, the 5 Series Touring has plenty of appeal. It is a big car anyway, which means the load bay is long and broad. Also, we love the added practicality of a separately-opening glass tailgate window – ideal for quickly chucking in a holdall or backpack.


There’s a very tempting range of excellent engines – even the entry-level 520d motor that dominated sales when new still has plenty going for it. BMW’s diesel engines were that bit more powerful than rival alternatives, which means a welcome extra bit of performance, despite fuel economy that also betters the competition.


It might be right for you in another way, too: the fact it still looks so upmarket and premium. This is a smart-looking car, and one that is ageing well, with a refined air that will still impress the neighbours. They need never know how much of a bargain the 5 Series has become.

What’s the best BMW 5 Series Touring model/engine to choose?

The BMW 5 Series you’ll see most frequently is the 520d. More than eight in 10 new 5 Series Tourings sold used this engine, because of its extremely tax-friendly nature. It saved company car drivers – and the businesses that employed them – thousands in fleet car liabilities. The benefit today is low-rate VED (road tax) and, of course, very impressive economy.


SE trim is entry-level, yet still comes with a very good level of standard equipment, including BMW’s excellent iDrive infotainment with, on post-facelift cars, standard sat-nav. These are the best bargains on the second-hand market and still look sporty enough.


M Sport models are sportier still, and very desirable. These versions have bigger wheels, more muscular styling and a nicely enhanced interior with bespoke BMW M details. They are the most appealing trim level for the 5 Series Touring, although prices do carry a premium that reflects this.

What other cars are similar to the BMW 5 Series Touring?

Just as it did when new, the BMW 5 Series Touring today goes head-to-head with the Audi A6 Avant and Mercedes-Benz E-Class Estate. The Jaguar XF Sportbrake is another premium contender, and the Volvo V90 is a nicely modern take on the classic Volvo estate (the earlier V70 is looking a bit bland these days, but offsets that with lower prices).


By now, many in this sector were looking at SUVs – models such as the BMW X3 and larger BMW X5, plus the Audi Q5 and Volvo XC60. The success of the SUV is part of the reason why estate cars such as this aren’t so popular today.

Learn more

BMW 5 Series Touring Interior

On the inside

BMW 5 Series Touring Driving Back

Driving

BMW 5 Series Touring Driving Side

How much does it cost to run

BMW 5 Series Touring Driving

Prices, versions and specification