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Ford Mustang Review

Ford Mustang
Ford Mustang
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Ford Mustang
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Ford Mustang
Ford Mustang
Ford Mustang
Ford Mustang

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Ford Mustang

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Ford Mustang

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Ford Mustang

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Ford Mustang

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Ford Mustang

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Ford Mustang

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Ford Mustang

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heycar review

      Launch year
      2015
      Body type
      Performance
      Fuel type
      Petrol
heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

00/10
heycar rating
Brash, loud American muscle car

Best bits

  • Properly exciting to drive
  • Head-turning exterior
  • Muscle car speed and performance

Not so great

  • Cramped and chintzy interior
  • Incredibly thirsty V8 engine
  • Three-star safety rating

Read by

Ford Mustang Exterior

Overall verdict

Ford Mustang interior

On the inside

Ford Mustang driving

Driving

Ford Mustang rear seats

How much does it cost to run

Ford Mustang Boot

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"The Ford Mustang is an old-school American muscle car redesigned for the modern age. It has been around since 1964, but until 2015 it was never sold here in Europe. The current incarnation uses the same formula that's the bedrock of its U.S. sales success, with a beefy design, powerful engines and entertaining handling."

Ford Mustang Exterior

Updated in 2018 with tweaked styling, an updated interior and the option of a new 10-speed automatic gearbox, the Mustang is available in two body styles; a ‘fastback’ coupe or a pricier soft-top convertible. For keen drivers, the former is your best bet, the additional weight of the fabric roof does its handling no favours.


Ford offers buyers the choice of a sensible(ish) 2.3-litre four-cylinder ‘EcoBoost’ engine with a turbo that helps it produce 291PS, or a 5.0-litre V8 with 449PS for the proper muscle car experience. The Mustang is one of the most affordable cars to offer this level of performance, but the running costs are still considerable.


If you are picking the Mustang over more conventional coupes, we recommend the V8 version. Not only is it thousands of pounds cheaper than any rivals with similar performance, it defines this car's visceral appeal. With the exhaust full open it sounds fantastic, propelling you up the road with alarming ferocity and speed.


This is a unique sports car that will suit buyers who want an antidote to refined, dainty European coupes with small engines and low carbon emissions. It's not a car for wallflowers or those who like to keep a low profile.

Yes, the Mustang makes a bold style statement no matter which version you buy. A wide selection of vibrant paint schemes, stripes and decals is available for extrovert buyers who want to guarantee some attention. 


At almost five metres long and over two wide, it feels vast on narrow UK roads, and will certainly turn heads, especially when you attempt to park it in a narrow town centre car park or village high street. Luckily, it does go round corners better than its predecessors, especially if you plump for the optional adaptive suspension.


The big alloy wheels do pick up on lumps and imperfections, sending a thud into the cabin, but it can play the comfortable long-distance cruiser, and in its sportier settings it has surprising poise and grip for its huge size. It does need to be grabbed by the scruff of the neck though, with heavy steering and a weighty clutch pedal. Some drivers will love this level of interaction, others will find it tiresome after the novelty begins to wear off.


While the cabin has some fun retro touches to remind you of the car's American heritage (including not one or two anniversary specials: the Bullitt and the 55 Edition) the quality of the material is fairly second-rate. It comes lavishly equipped, and only sat-nav is missing from the lengthy standard specification sheet. Still, all of its European and Japanese rivals look and feels more expensive inside, and are likely to be more robust.


Despite its two-door layout, the Mustang is reasonably practical. There are four seats (but the ones in the back are only suitable for small kids) and the boot is decent, but access is limited by the awkward tailgate. Good luck trying to justify it as sensible family transport though, especially with its poor crash safety rating.


The Ford is charming, bursting with character and some pretty serious performance. It's a marmite coupe, and if you're attracted by the outlandish looks and V8 engine, you'll be thoroughly satisfied with your buy. For buyers less interested in exhaust noise and cornering ability, several rivals make more financial sense.


There is nothing like the Mustang. If you are after the authentic all-American muscle car experience, then nothing else will do. The thunderous V8, loud colours and cartoonish design gives it a sense of fun its rivals lack. Still, be aware that patchy quality, limited practicality and the potential for punitive running costs await.

Ready to get your top quality Ford Mustang?

  • All cars come with a warranty
  • Selected dealers only
  • All quality checked

Ford Mustang

5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto

  • 2018
  • 15,242 miles
  • Marshall Ford Cambridge
  • Cambridgeshire, CB58SQ
Price:£32,950
PCP: £454.50/mo

Representative example: Contract Length: 37 months, 36 Monthly Payments: £454.50, Customer Deposit: £4,942.00, Total Deposit: £4,942.50, Optional Final Payment: £17,717.59, Total Charge For Credit: £6,072.09, Total Amount Payable: £39,022.09, Representative APR: 8.9%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 4.58%, Excess Mileage Charge: 14.9ppm, Mileage Per Annum: 10,000

Ford Mustang

5.0 V8 GT 2dr Auto

  • 2018
  • 30,017 miles
  • TrustFord Staines
  • Middlesex, TW184JQ
Price:£31,000
PCP: £554.91/mo

Representative example: Contract Length: 36 months, 35 Monthly Payments: £554.91, Customer Deposit: £4,650.00, Total Deposit: £4,650.00, Optional Final Payment: £14,499.00, Total Charge For Credit: £7,570.85, Total Amount Payable: £38,570.85, Representative APR: 12.9%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 12.18%, Excess Mileage Charge: 12ppm, Mileage Per Annum: 10,000

Is the Ford Mustang right for you?

If you grew up watching movies like Bullitt, Gone in 60 Seconds, or even the Fast & Furious Franchise and got bitten by the muscle car bug, then nothing is going to able to scratch that itch like the current Mustang.


The brash looks, huge V8 engine and tyre smoking rear-wheel drive chassis give it a unique appeal, and it's a fun coupe to drive at any speed. It'll suit drivers crying out for the mechanical involvement and character of a sports car that doesn't take itself too seriously, but mentally prepare yourself for the painful running costs.


Although this sixth-generation was the first to be offered in right-hand drive, there some US-specific quirks to contend with, like the awkward handbrake placement, iffy cabin quality and sheer size of the thing; it's vast.


Older cars were a performance bargain, but now the prices have risen, there are a number of talented two-seat coupes that will give you sharper handling, lower costs, and an easier overall ownership experience. Still, none of those cars come as well equipped as the Mustang, and fewer still have the same sense of fun.

What’s the best Ford Mustang model/engine to choose?

The most affordable Mustang is the 2.3-litre EcoBoost, but having a four-cylinder engine in a muscle car is like dressing a sheep in wolf's clothing. It'll cost a bit less to run, but really, you'll be missing the whole point.


To really deliver on the muscle car dream, we'd go for the 5.0 V8 GT with a six-speed manual gearbox and the attractive Fastback coupe body style. In this spec it's brilliant fun to drive, usefully cheaper than both the Bullitt special edition and softer convertible, and relatively practical too (at least for a two-door sports car).


Choosing this trim also saves you enough money for the excellent adaptive dampers, and if you want them, a nice set of Recaro seats. We'd argue that if you're worried about its running costs, this isn't the car for you.


The Cabriolet is softer sprung and heavier, blunting the steering response and body control. This makes it a lot less engaging on a twisty road, and the same is true of the automatic gearbox, it's quicker but not as fun.

What other cars are similar to the Ford Mustang?

The Mustangs stacks up against petite European coupes like chalk and cheeseburgers. Cars like Audi's TTS and Alpine A110 have dainty bodies, automatic gearboxes, and can both achieve over 40mpg when needed.


If you want a V8-powered coupe then the Lexus RC F is a Japanese take on the muscle car, with a 5.0-litre engine and an interior that makes the Mustang look like a cheap child's toy, but it also costs £20,000 more.


For a similarly old-school driving experience, a manual gearbox and four seats, the BMW M2 Competition is sharper to drive, only a bit more expensive than the top-spec Ford, with a small footprint and posher badge.


The cabriolet competes with larger open-tops such as the Audi A5, BMW 4 Series and Mercedes C-Class. It is outclassed in most areas by those rivals, especially when it comes to cabin quality and refinement, but is aimed squarely at driving enthusiasts who aren't so fussed by its quirks, and not thrusting middle managers.

Learn more

Ford Mustang interior

On the inside

Ford Mustang driving

Driving

Ford Mustang rear seats

How much does it cost to run

Ford Mustang Boot

Prices, versions and specification

Ask the heycar experts: common questions

What are the different types of Mustangs?

Ford sells several extreme high-performance versions of the Mustang in the U.S., including a 750PS Shelby GT500. In the UK things are simpler, with two trim levels depending on the engine you choose. EcoBoost starts the range, V8 models are badged ‘GT’, and a ‘Bullitt’ special edition (named after the famous film starring Steve McQueen) is the most expensive.

Andy Brady

Answered by

Andy Brady

Is the Ford Mustang a good second hand buy?

Because of its affordable price when new, used Mustangs, especially the GT models, are highly sought after on the used market. That means resale values are strong, but we would advise potential buyers to look closely for signs of a hard life, especially tyre and brake wear.

David Ross

Answered by

David Ross

Can I buy a Mustang convertible?

Absolutely. The brand lets you freely mix-and-match the body style, engine and gearbox of your choice so you tailor the Mustang to fit your needs. Still, the Bullitt version is coupé only.

Dan Powell

Answered by

Dan Powell

Is the Ford Mustang a good car?

If you want an imposing muscle car then the Ford Mustang is an excellent choice. It's not the most sophisticated sports car around and there are a few question marks over the quality of the finish inside, but it's a good sports car, especially given the price tag when compared with rivals.

David Ross

Answered by

David Ross