Honda CR-V Review logo

Honda CR-V Review

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heycar review

      Launch year
      2018
      Body type
      Crossover
      Fuel type
      Petrol, Hybrid
Andy Brady

Written by

Andy Brady

00/10
heycar rating
“Practical and comfortable. No diesel”

Best bits

  • Extremely comfortable SUV
  • Spacious interior
  • Hybrid model is very refined

Not so great

  • Seven-seat CR-V isn’t as practical as you might expect
  • No diesel option
  • Dated infotainment lets it down

Read by

Honda CR-V 2018 frontright exterior

Overall verdict

Honda CR-V 2018 front interior

On the inside

Honda CR-V 2018 frontright exterior

Driving

Honda CR-V 2018 central console

How much does it cost to run

Honda CR-V 2018 boot open

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"The Honda CR-V is an utterly dependable SUV that’ll tick a lot of boxes for a lot of buyers. We like how comfortable it is, while there’s enough space for most families (providing you don’t actually need to use seven seats regularly). The lack of a diesel engine limits its market quite significantly, but the petrol and hybrid offerings are pretty good."

Honda CR-V 2018 frontright exterior

If you’re looking for a sensible family car, you’d be hard pushed to beat the Honda CR-V. Its a practical SUV, with a comfortable cabin and up to seven seats. Unfortunately, a lack of a diesel engine means it won’t be for everyone - but the hybrid alternative is extremely refined and fairly efficient.


Honda tried to move the CR-V upmarket when its latest model arrived in 2018. That means a new one will be a bit more expensive than its predecessor, although there are some good nearly-new deals available.


It also means the interior is considerably plusher than before. The seats in particular are of note - they’re very comfortable and supportive, making the CR-V a brilliant long-distance companion. It’s a shame the infotainment isn’t as good as you’d find in a Volkswagen Tiguan Allspace, for example, but that shouldn’t be enough to put you off the CR-V entirely.


For the first time, the CR-V is offered with seven seats. We’d recommend sticking with a five-seater, though, for a number of reasons. For a start, the third row of seats are very cramped and really only suitable for children (who’ll soon get bored once the novelty of travelling in the boot has worn off).


They also hinder boot space. Even with them dropped flat, the seven-seat CR-V’s boot isn’t as big as the five-seat model. And when they’re in use, there’s hardly any space for anything other than a shopping bag or two.


Honda offers two engines in the CR-V: a 1.5-litre petrol and a 2.0-litre hybrid. The 1.5-litre is fine, especially if you look for one with the CVT automatic gearbox that removes the need to change gears yourself.


The 2.0-litre hybrid is the one to go for, though. It’s only available with five seats (another reason to avoid seven-seat models) and comes with the CVT transmission as standard. It’s also available with front- or four-wheel-drive, with the latter not impacting fuel economy as much as you might think.


Once you’ve decided which engine you’d like, there are four different trim levels available. We’d avoid the entry-level S model (it’s very basic), but the rest of the range is fairly well equipped. The SEs come with desirable features like 18-inch alloy wheels, a rear-view camera and the seven-inch navigation system (with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto).


The high-spec SR adds luxurious leather seats, ambient interior lighting and privacy class, as well as some useful extra safety systems. Topping the range is the CR-V EX, with 19-inch alloy wheels, a panoramic glass sunroof and a heated steering wheel.


There’s the usual lengthy list of safety equipment on the CR-V. That’s a good thing for a family SUV. These include things like lane assist, autonomous emergency braking and Isofix child seat mounting points - all standard across the range, contributing to a five-star Euro NCAP safety rating.


Honda’s limited its market by not selling the CR-V with a diesel engine. But if it works for you, it’s a very practical SUV that’ll be fairly cheap to run and should be an extremely dependable choice. It’s a very easy car to recommend in a very crowded marketplace.


If you're looking for the older version, you need our Honda CR-V (2012-2018) review.

Is the Honda CR-V right for you?

If you’re not fussed about a diesel engine and don’t need to use seven seats regularly, the Honda CR-V is an extremely practical and comfortable choice. We like how refined hybrid models are, and it represents good value for money on the used market (even if it is a bit pricey when new).

What’s the best Honda CR-V model/engine to choose?

Go for the hybrid model if you can, while deciding between two- or four-wheel-drive is down to your individual requirements. We’d suggest mid-level SE or SR trims represent the best value for money.

What other cars are similar to the Honda CR-V?

The Toyota RAV4 is the Honda CR-V’s arch-nemesis, also combining impressive practicality with hybrid power and a reputation for reliability. You could also consider a wide range of SUVs such as the Skoda Kodiaq, SEAT Tarraco, Volkswagen Tiguan Allspace, Peugeot 5008 and Mazda CX-5.

Learn more

Honda CR-V 2018 front interior

On the inside

Honda CR-V 2018 frontright exterior

Driving

Honda CR-V 2018 central console

How much does it cost to run

Honda CR-V 2018 boot open

Prices, versions and specification