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Infiniti Q50 Review

Infiniti Q50
Infiniti Q50
Infiniti Q50
Infiniti Q50
Infiniti Q50
Infiniti Q50
Infiniti Q50
Infiniti Q50
Infiniti Q50
Infiniti Q50

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Infiniti Q50

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Infiniti Q50

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Infiniti Q50

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Infiniti Q50

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Infiniti Q50

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Infiniti Q50

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Infiniti Q50

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Infiniti Q50

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1 / 9

heycar review

      Launch year
      2013
      Body type
      Premium
      Fuel type
      Diesel, Petrol, Hybrid
David Ross

Written by

David Ross

00/10
heycar rating
Saloon that misses the mark

Best bits

  • Comfortable and well finished inside
  • A rare sight and something different from the usual saloons
  • Good value used thanks to generous standard kit 

Not so great

  • Hard to recommend over much better rivals
  • Dated interior design
  • Diesel is noisy and steering lifeless

Read by

Infiniti Q50 frontright exterior

Overall verdict

Infiniti Q50 front interior

On the inside

Infiniti Q50 frontleft exterior

Driving

Infiniti Q50 leftside exterior

How much does it cost to run

Infiniti Q50 back interior

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"Ultimately it’s hard to recommend the Q50 over any of the competition. If there’s one thing we can say is that as a used buy, you get a high specification for the money, but there’s little else to back that up. Sadly the Q50 misses the mark in too many areas and we can pick out half a dozen competitors that are a better buy."

Infiniti Q50 frontright exterior

The Infiniti Q50 was one of Infiniti’s big hopes. The four-door saloon was, in Infiniti’s words, designed to ‘push the boundaries with advanced technology and bring a new level of premium motoring and premium style’. Sadly, it didn’t.


There’s a reason you never see any around. Despite all Infiniti’s talk, the Q50 fell well short of the competition in pretty much every area. As a result, few people bought one - at one point Infiniti was selling fewer cars a year than Maserati. It means that the Q50 is a rare sight on our roads. 


That has appeal if you want something that’s different from the usual rows of BMW and Audi saloons you see everywhere. But while the Q50 different, it doesn’t exactly stand out. The styling is generically dull and most people are likely to look at the badge with a puzzled expression under their furrowed brow rather than be impressed. 


Infiniti is Nissan’s upmarket brand (in a similar fashion to Lexus and Toyota) but while it sells well in the USA, it has been as popular as scurvy over here. So much so that Infiniti pulled the plug in the UK in 2019. If you hadn’t heard of Infiniti before, it’s unlikely you will in the future…


So why does the Q50 lag behind its rivals? The problem isn’t that it’s a fundamentally poor car. On paper, it had a lot going for it with Nissan build quality, advanced tech including an innovative steer by wire system and a V6 hybrid model with real pace. But in every area, the Q50 can’t match the competition which seems a generation ahead in most respects. 


The interior of the Infiniti is like a return to the early 2000s and not in a good way. The various Nissan-sourced switches and buttons do it few favours while the foot-operated parking brake shows you how old fashioned this is. It does at least have very good seats, but overall, there’s very little ‘premium’ here.


The steering is very odd and never feels pleasant let alone engaging while the ride quality is a mixed bag, feeling too firm in some models. The 2.2-litre diesel engine which powers most models was sourced from Mercedes but lacks refinement in the Q50, making it noisy with lots of vibration in the cabin. 


The 2.0T is quieter and much better all round but it’s thirsty and while the Q50 Hybrid is rapid, it’s expensive to run and not as sophisticated as a hybrid from Lexus, BMW or Mercedes. Compare each Q50i to similar rivals and you’ll find it’s less economical and costs more to insure. 

Ready to get your top quality Infiniti Q50?

  • All cars come with a warranty
  • Selected dealers only
  • All quality checked

Infiniti Q50

2.2d Sport 4dr Auto

  • 2016
  • 33,264 miles
  • Harratts Used Car Centre Pontefract
  • Yorkshire, WF84DB
Price:£10,990
HP: £297.53/mo

Representative example: Contract Length: 36 months, 36 Monthly Payments: £297.53, Customer Deposit: £1,648.00, Total Deposit: £1,648.50, Total Charge For Credit: £1,369.58, Total Amount Payable: £12,359.58, Representative APR: 9.5%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 9.04%

Is the Infiniti Q50 right for you?

If you want something that’s comfortable, well built and different to the usual saloons around, the Q50 could be what you’re after. It’s hardly striking in design but is at least something apart from the rows of 3 Series and A4s you’ll see at every motorway services car park.


Infiniti is owned by Nissan, so there are no question marks over the quality and engineering of the Q50. The hybrid version, a rival to the Lexus IS300h, is very comfortable and ideal if you’re not covering many miles each year. 


Be wary though that with Infiniti no longer sold in the UK, servicing and aftersales care will be handled by Nissan, while long term parts supply could become an issue.

What's the best Infiniti Q50 model to choose?

The best here really comes down to what’s available and what kind of driving you’re doing. The Q50 did not sell in big numbers so there are few around on the used market. 


The 2.2d is the most common and the cheapest, so can represent a bit of a bargain given the huge specification most come with. However, it’s the less spotted 2.0T petrol that’s actually the best engine in the range. 


All models, even the standard SE versions, come with plenty of standard kit. The manual is notchy and unpleasant so the automatic, although sluggish, is the better choice.


The hybrid model with its big 3.5-litre V6 is the top of the range model and makes sense if you want something comfortable and a bit posh but only cover low mileages. Sport Tech is the top trim and worth seeking out if you want a fully-loaded car. 

What other cars are similar to the Infiniti Q50?

If you’re looking at premium saloons there’s no shortage of choice with the usual suspects leading the way. Those being the Audi A4, Mercedes C-Class and everyone’s favourite motorway tailgater, the BMW 3 Series. It’s hard to make a strong case for the Infiniti against this lot.


The Jaguar XE may not quite be a match for above, but it still handles superbly well and if it’s comfort you want, the Volvo S60 is refined and beautifully designed. As for others that are a little different to the mainstream, there’s the gorgeous Alfa Giulia or consider the Volkswagen Arteon


If you want a reliable and well-engineered hybrid saloon, the Toyota Camry is a strong choice or the Lexus IS, despite its ageing years, still offers a very refined and smooth driving experience.


Learn more

Infiniti Q50 front interior

On the inside

Infiniti Q50 frontleft exterior

Driving

Infiniti Q50 leftside exterior

How much does it cost to run

Infiniti Q50 back interior

Prices, versions and specification