Jaguar F-Type Review logo

Jaguar F-Type Review

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heycar review

      Launch year
      2013
      Body type
      Performance
      Fuel type
      Petrol
heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

00/10
heycar rating
“Competent, beautiful Jaguar ageing well ”

Best bits

  • Damn, it’s pretty
  • Those V8s sound magnificent 
  • It’s not a Porsche, and that’s a good thing

Not so great

  • You still want an Aston Martin Vantage, don’t you?
  • Those V8s will be scarily expensive to run
  • Infotainment still lags behind rivals on user friendliness 

Read by

Jaguar F-Type frontleft exterior

Overall verdict

Jaguar F-Type front interior

On the inside

Jaguar F-Type frontright exterior

Driving

Jaguar F-Type leftside exterior

How much does it cost to run

Jaguar F-Type backright exterior

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"Having such a wide range of models to compete against does make the job for the F-Type difficult, but it’s a credit to the car’s capabilities that it’s able to do so pretty convincingly. Sports cars aren’t rational and, undeniably, the Jaguar is abundantly endowed with emotional appeal.  The F-Type is aging well, but, inevitably, the gap between it and its rivals is ever-widening, though not yet to the point you shouldn’t consider one. "

Jaguar F-Type frontleft exterior

Jaguar introduced the F-Type back in 2013, but it’s taken until late 2019 until it’s refreshed its sportscar offering’s looks, taking the opportunity too to rationalise the range a bit, slimming down the engine offering, all of which makes choosing your F-Type simpler.


For all its age, the F-Type remains a real head-turner, which, in this class is a real virtue. It helps it’s not one of the Porsches it competes against, with the F-Type’s range and pricing spanning the 718 Cayman/Boxster models, as well as Porsche’s 911 Carreras, the F-Type a more deliberate choice than the somewhat predictable Stuttgart cars.



Deliberate and good looking, while we’d have applauded you for buying the old F-Type on its looks alone, the face-lifted car’s revised styling really does elevate it to a new level. There’s some real elegance to the front end, the sharper rear lights adding some sharper definition around its tail too. At the F-Type’s launch back in 2013 a lot of noise was made about it evoking its E-Type ancestor, that never really ringing true back then, now the link is a bit more tangible.


Inside, it’s largely the same as it has always been, but through time Jaguar has sensibly concentrated on improving the material qualities, as well as the fit and finish. Think finessing then, rather than widespread changes inside, which given its design was fundamentally correct when it was launched is no bad thing. There’s improved, if still imperfect, infotainment in the 2020 models, while the simplified engine line up makes it easier to decide which F-Type to choose. 


Previously the F-Type’s engine heartland was a choice of V6s, but they’ve been dropped, Jaguar now offering the F-Type with either a turbocharged, 2.0-litre, four-cylinder engine, or a supercharged 5.0-litre V8. There’s quite a gap between those powerplants, with that entry-level engine delivering 300PS and 400Nm, compared to the 450PS and 580Nm that the supercharged V8 develops.


If 450PS isn’t quite healthy enough an output for you then there’s another version of that supercharged V8 available, it being tuned to deliver 575PS and 700Nm of torque – numbers that better Jaguar’s old XJ220. Sensibly, given that monstrous output, the range-topping F-Type is only available with four-wheel drive, with the 450PS version being offered with either four- or rear-wheel drive, and the four-cylinder entry-level car being rear-wheel drive only. 


Unambiguously, Jaguar names its F-Type line up using its power outputs, so that entry-level car is the P300, with the P450 and P575 above it. All are available in either closed coupe or opening convertible forms and are two-seaters. Jaguar has yet to announce any SVO (Special Vehicle Operations) model spun off the range-topping model, but as sure as rainwater eventually becomes seawater, an SVO model will be offered, it likely to have around 600PS and a more hardcore focus. 


Is the Jaguar F-Type right for you?

You’ve discounted the idea of a Porsche, either the 718 models or 911s, Audi’s R8’s a bit too compromised, and BMW or Mercedes-Benz don’t appeal, either. An Aston Martin Vantage is still a bit out of reach, for now. The F-Type range’s breadth really is wide enough to cover all those bases, partially at least. 


Chances are you’ve owned Jaguars before or have always loved the E-Type and want some of that in a more modern package. It’s an indulgent car the F-Type, being a two-seater, and while there are obvious compromises because of that, practicalities like boot space being one, potential running costs, another, but you’ve worked hard for your F-Type, and deserve it. 

What’s the best Jaguar F-Type model or engine to choose?

Jaguar offers the F-Type with those three power outputs spread over two engine choices, with three trim levels encompassing F-Type, R-Dynamic for the P300 and P450, and R – reserved for that P575 model. A fourth, limited First Edition choice being offered at launch in 2020 on the P300 and P450 for the first year of production only. 


It’s difficult to argue against the P300 model, which might lack the muscularity of those V8’s performance, but also do without their more punitive running costs. It’s a fine handling, quick enough car, which in R-Dynamic trim benefits from slightly more assertive styling thanks to some glossy black exterior finishes, while the wheels grow an inch to 19-inches. 


Crucially, with the R-Dynamic you get an active, switchable exhaust system, which helps give that four-cylinder a more appealing sound. The only real decision is open or closed, and that probably depends on how you’re using it, but if it’s a daily driver the coupe makes more sense, though a convertible for the weekend would be very pleasing, too. 


What other cars are similar to the Jaguar F-Type?

The F-Type really does line-up against a broad church of potential rivals, at one end it’s in the smaller, relatively affordable end of the sports car spectrum, and at the other, it’s chasing supercars, on pace, if not necessarily outlay. 


That’s between around £50,000 and £100,000, so there’s the Porsche 718 Cayman and 911 line ups, cars like the BMW Z4 and Mercedes-Benz SLC/SL, purist sports cars like the Alpine A110 and Lotus Evoras or Exiges, as well as things like Audi TTs to R8s. An F-Type buyer might also consider Aston Martin’s Vantage, too, even if you could have a pair of F-Types for the sort of money you’d need to find for one Aston Martin. 


Learn more

Jaguar F-Type front interior

On the inside

Jaguar F-Type frontright exterior

Driving

Jaguar F-Type leftside exterior

How much does it cost to run

Jaguar F-Type backright exterior

Prices, versions and specification