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Mercedes-Benz C-Class Cabriolet Review logo

Mercedes-Benz C-Class Cabriolet Review

Mercedes-Benz C-Class
Mercedes-Benz C-Class
Mercedes-Benz C-Class
Mercedes-Benz C-Class
Mercedes-Benz C-Class
Mercedes-Benz C-Class
Mercedes-Benz C-Class
Mercedes-Benz C-Class
Mercedes-Benz C-Class
Mercedes-Benz C-Class
Mercedes-Benz C-Class

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Mercedes-Benz C-Class

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Mercedes-Benz C-Class

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Mercedes-Benz C-Class

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Mercedes-Benz C-Class

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Mercedes-Benz C-Class

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Mercedes-Benz C-Class

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heycar review

      Launch year
      2016
      Body type
      Convertible
      Fuel type
      Petrol, Diesel
heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

00/10
heycar rating
Premium four-seat convertible cruiser

Best bits

  • Refined and relaxed to drive
  • Generous levels of standard equipment 
  • A relatively affordable luxury experience

Not so great

  • Ride can feel firm, especially on sportier models
  • Rear seats are compromised for adult passengers
  • AMG models are much pricier

Read by

Mercedes C-Class Cabriolet side exterior

Overall verdict

Mercedes C-Class Cabriolet front interior

On the inside

Mercedes C-Class Cabriolet front left exterior

Driving

Mercedes C-Class Cabriolet rear exterior

How much does it cost to run

Mercedes C-Class Cabriolet side interior

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"In a tightly competitive marketplace, the Mercedes-Benz C-Class Cabriolet demonstrates strengths in a number of areas. Its handsome styling is combined with a classy interior, while a premium badge and generous equipment add to the impressive package."

Mercedes C-Class Cabriolet side exterior

Buying a convertible is all about treating yourself. That makes the Mercedes-Benz C-Class Cabriolet a strong contender, combining a premium badge with a price tag that is relatively affordable. Throw good looks and plentiful technology into the mix and it’s easy to see why the C-Class is a winner for many.


That handsome styling is shared with the Mercedes C-Class Coupe, with the transformation into a convertible proving a sleek success. Unlike some rivals, the roof on the C-Class Cabriolet is a folding fabric soft-top. This has advantages when it comes to weight and saving space, although some may prefer the added security of a solid metal roof. 


Mercedes-Benz does brand the C-Class Cabriolet as a full four-seater. However, that claim should be taken with a pinch of salt. While it may have two seats in the rear, you will need to be selective about who sits there. Legroom is in short supply for anyone beyond child size, while headroom (with the roof up, obviously) can feel quite tight for adults. 


Occasional use of the back seats by kids, or as an extension of the boot, means the C-Class does still have practical appeal. It is certainly more useful than the Mercedes-Benz SLC roadster, for instance. Just be aware that lowering the roof does diminish boot space. At least Mercedes has worked hard to make things refined in the cabin with the roof down. 


Indeed, refinement is one of the key features of the C-Class Cabriolet. Features such as the small spoiler on top of the windscreen help keep buffeting to a minimum, as does a pop-up wind deflector. Unlike some convertibles, the approach taken by Mercedes also means the small rear seats remain accessible with the wind deflector in use. 


Driving the C-Class Cabriolet also demonstrates how Mercedes-Benz has attempted to balance sportiness alongside comfort. Extra strengthening to counter the lack of a solid roof means the C-Class can feel quite stiffly sprung on the road, especially on versions with bigger wheels. It certainly feels harder than the C-Class Coupe, but never to the point of being too uncomfortable for daily use. 


Light but precise steering is another key factor in how the C-Class Cabriolet drives. It suits the ‘cruiser’ image of the car, even if performance AMG versions deliver a serious turn of pace. Engine options begin with four-cylinder petrol and diesel units, rising to a range-topping V8. Rear-wheel drive is standard, but four-wheel drive is also available on many versions, along with an excellent nine-speed automatic gearbox. 


Inside, the C-Class Cabriolet comes with a range of technology mounted within a stylish and well-made dashboard. Satellite navigation, keyless entry, parking sensors and electrically adjustable seats are all standard, with plenty of safety equipment also included. 


The C-Class Cabriolet is a good bet for those looking for classy convertible. Whether you’re making trips around town or covering longer distances, the C-Class offers a luxurious experience with very few drawbacks.

Is the Mercedes-Benz C-Class Cabriolet right for you?

What sets the C-Class Cabriolet apart from many rivals is its overall combination of style, performance, technology, and usability. It does so much, so well.


Beyond the limited rear-seat space (something that affects many convertibles) there are no major compromises to be made. The firm ride may take some adapting to, but this can be minimised with a careful choice of options. A fabric soft-top may be of concern for some, but Mercedes has overcome the main issue of inferior refinement. 


The car could be used daily for commuting, yet would still feel like a treat when you head into the country at weekends for driving pleasure. Unless you are looking for a convertible that can double-up as a practical family car, there are no real limitations to choosing a C-Class.

What’s the best Mercedes-Benz C-Class Cabriolet model/engine to choose?

Many buyers will find the petrol C 200 more than enough for their needs. The four-cylinder turbocharged engine produces 184PS, which helps it feel brisk, if not a true performance machine. 


For those who cover longer distances, the C 220d diesel makes a lot of sense. With 170PS, it has almost as much power as the petrol C 200, but benefits from more low-down torque. It can also achieve up to 51 mpg, saving you money at the pumps. 


Regardless of fuel type, we would recommend a model with the 9G-Tronic automatic gearbox. It suits the nature of the C-Class perfectly, and helps boost efficiency. AMG Line trim also delivers notable value for money, combining lots of equipment with fancier styling for little extra cost.

What other cars are similar to the Mercedes-Benz C-Class Cabriolet?

The BMW 4 Series Convertible is the closest rival to the C-Class, offering four seats and superb driving dynamics. However, the BMW uses a folding metal roof. While this adds security, it does also bring a penalty of extra weight and a smaller boot than the Mercedes. 


Audi’s A5 Cabriolet delivers an even classier interior than the C-Class, and also makes use of a fabric soft-top roof. The Mercedes edges the Audi slightly for ride comfort, but the margins between all three German cars are small. 


The Range Rover Evoque Convertible offers a leftfield take on the premium cabrio concept, even if it remains a rarity. And if performance matters most, the Ford Mustang Convertible offers serious power at a bargain price. 

Learn more

Mercedes C-Class Cabriolet front interior

On the inside

Mercedes C-Class Cabriolet front left exterior

Driving

Mercedes C-Class Cabriolet rear exterior

How much does it cost to run

Mercedes C-Class Cabriolet side interior

Prices, versions and specification

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