Favourites
Mercedes-Benz V-Class Review logo

Mercedes-Benz V-Class Review

Mercedes-Benz V-Class
Mercedes-Benz V-Class
Mercedes-Benz V-Class
Mercedes-Benz V-Class
Mercedes-Benz V-Class
Mercedes-Benz V-Class
Mercedes-Benz V-Class
Mercedes-Benz V-Class
Mercedes-Benz V-Class
Mercedes-Benz V-Class
Mercedes-Benz V-Class

1/10

Mercedes-Benz V-Class

2/10

Mercedes-Benz V-Class

3/10

Mercedes-Benz V-Class

4/10

Mercedes-Benz V-Class

5/10

Mercedes-Benz V-Class

6/10

Mercedes-Benz V-Class

7/10

Mercedes-Benz V-Class

8/10

Mercedes-Benz V-Class

9/10

Mercedes-Benz V-Class

10/10

1 / 10

heycar review

      Launch year
      2015
      Body type
      MPV
      Fuel type
      Diesel
heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

00/10
heycar rating
Big and plush, but pricey

Best bits

  •  Good looks and high image
  • Loads of space for eight in cabin
  • Smooth driving manners

Not so great

  • Even entry model is expensive
  • Diesel engines can be gruff
  • Seats are heavy to move around

Read by

Mercedes V-Class frontright exterior

Overall verdict

Mercedes V-Class front interior

On the inside

Mercedes V-Class frontright exterior

Driving

Mercedes V-Class backright exterior

How much does it cost to run

Mercedes V-Class seating

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"While there’s no denying the Mercedes V-Class owes its roots to the company’s van side of the business, this luxury MPV is a great deal more than just a box with some seats bolted in. The cabin of the V-Class has more in common with a luxury saloon than a van or MPV, with plush materials, a high-quality dashboard and excellent refinement even at motorway speeds."

Mercedes V-Class frontright exterior

There are eight seats as standard or seven if you opt for one of the more luxurious variants. The rear seats can be slid back and forth or turned around, so passengers can face one another or the direction of travel. The layout can be adjusted to maximise load space or passenger space, depending on how the V-Class is being used. You can also choose to have as few as four seats to turn the V-Class into an office or limousine.


Electric sliding rear doors are standard and make for easy passenger access, plus there is an electric tailgate. This can be configured to stop at a pre-set height, which is useful in multi-storey car parks. Handily, the glass section can be opened separately for loading small items in really tight spaces.


Comfort levels are very good both in the front and rear, thanks to standard leather upholstery and, in Extra Long variants, rear climate control. The front seats are heated as standard and there is good standard equipment, including an infotainment system lifted from the latest A-Class with MBUX to allow voice control and comprehensive connectivity.


Most V-Class models will be powered by the 2.0-litre turbodiesel engine, which produces 163PS and 380Nm of torque. It’s capable enough to haul the vehicle along fully-loaded at motorway speeds, plus it’s reasonably quiet and refined unless pushed hard. It’s relaxing to drive thanks to the standard-fit nine-speed automatic transmission as the more potent V300d model.


The 300d is still a 2.0-litre but boasts a much more substantial 239PS plus a hefty 500Nm of shove. Together, they see this V-Class swish past 62mph from rest in as little as 7.8 seconds in the standard wheelbase model. Impressive stuff and the V-Class can also turn in up to 37.7mpg combined economy.


Just as relevantly as this turn of speed and decent efficiency is the way the V-Class conducts itself along any road. There’s no point having a luxurious cabin if the suspension crashes at every bump. Thankfully, the Mercedes is adept at smoothing its way down any length of road and the engines are pleasingly quiet unless worked close to their rev limits.


The V-Class might not be as cheap as a Ford Tourneo Custom or Volkswagen Caravelle, but if you need a genuinely luxurious, upmarket people carrier, it’s well worth the extra. The luxury saloon-like cabin, excellent refinement, generous levels of space, quality finish, versatility and high specification make the V-Class feel a cut above the competition.


Ready to get your top quality Mercedes-Benz V-Class?

  • All cars come with a warranty
  • Selected dealers only
  • All quality checked

Mercedes-Benz V-Class

V220 BlueTEC Sport 5dr Auto [Extra Long]

  • 2020
  • 320 miles
  • Mercedes-Benz of Beaconsfield
  • Buckinghamshire, HP91QJ
Price:£41,000
HP: £1,115.98/mo

Representative example: Contract Length: 36 months, 36 Monthly Payments: £1,115.98, Customer Deposit: £6,150.00, Total Deposit: £6,150.00, Total Charge For Credit: £5,325.28, Total Amount Payable: £46,325.28, Representative APR: 9.9%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 9.48%

Mercedes-Benz V-Class

V220 BlueTEC Sport 5dr Auto [Extra Long]

  • 2017
  • 36,513 miles
  • JCB Mercedes-Benz Gillingham
  • Kent, ME86YX
Price:£27,990
HP: £736.11/mo

Representative example: Contract Length: 36 months, 35 Monthly Payments: £736.11, Customer Deposit: £4,198.00, Total Deposit: £4,198.50, Total Charge For Credit: £2,718.46, Total Amount Payable: £30,708.46, Representative APR: 7.4%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 7.14%

 Is the Mercedes V-Class right for you?

If you have a big family to carry around a lot of the time or you’re a captain of industry too busy to waste travelling time, the Mercedes V-Class is the MPV for you. In standard form, it comes with seven seats, so you can pack in the kids and granny in plenty of comfort.


The higher spec models come with seven seats or you can opt for fewer seats again to create more space to lounge around in, while longer body versions have eight seats as standard. There’s a plethora of options to make the cabin more opulent, as well as three body lengths to help accommodate people and luggage to huge degree.


There’s only one engine option in the V-Class, but the 2.0-litre turbo diesel is available in higher and lower power outputs. The less potent version is ideal for most needs, while the higher powered version is a bit of a closet hot hatch thanks to its turn of speed. Both come with a slick nine-speed auto as standard.


What’s the best Mercedes V-Class model/engine to choose?

Let’s be blunt here: which V-Class model you choose will have a lot to do with the depth of your pockets. Prices start high for the standard length Sport model and go up considerably from there. We’d take the Sport version as it has eight seats as standard, giving the maximum seating and luggage versatility.


For body length, the Extra Long model is the one to have as it offers up more space for luggage and for the seats to arranged for the most legroom. However, if you spend more time driving in town and need to park in compact space, the standard wheelbase model will make more sense.


For the drivetrain, the V220d is all you really need and has the slick nine-speed automatic gearbox as standard. While it would be enjoyable to have the extra pace of the V300d, its £4000 premium for the extra power is hard to justify for most drivers.


What other cars are similar to the Mercedes V-Class?

Volkswagen’s Caravelle is the natural rival for the Mercedes V-Class as not only does it have the seating to match the Merc, it has the badge appeal. Like the V-Class, the Volkswagen is expensive to buy, but offsets this with strong residual values and a very comfortable cabin.


The Citroen SpaceTourer and Peugeot Traveller are more affordable alternatives to the Mercedes and both drive very well. The Toyota Proace Verso is another one to consider, though it does not quite hide its van origins as well as the Mercedes in the way it drives.


Ford’s Tourneo Custom is the other big player in this equally big MPV sector. It’s good to drive and more affordable than the Mercedes, but it doesn’t have the same classy feel.


Learn more

Mercedes V-Class front interior

On the inside

Mercedes V-Class frontright exterior

Driving

Mercedes V-Class backright exterior

How much does it cost to run

Mercedes V-Class seating

Prices, versions and specification