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Mitsubishi Outlander Review

Mitsubishi Outlander
Mitsubishi Outlander
Mitsubishi Outlander
Mitsubishi Outlander
Mitsubishi Outlander
Mitsubishi Outlander
Mitsubishi Outlander
Mitsubishi Outlander
Mitsubishi Outlander

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Mitsubishi Outlander

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Mitsubishi Outlander

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Mitsubishi Outlander

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Mitsubishi Outlander

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Mitsubishi Outlander

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Mitsubishi Outlander

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Mitsubishi Outlander

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heycar review

      Launch year
      2013
      Body type
      SUV
      Fuel type
      Petrol, Diesel
heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

00/10
heycar rating
Roomy, dated seven-seater SUV

Best bits

  • Generously equipped
  • Huge boot in five-seat mode
  • Cheaper than its rivals

Not so great

  • Roly-poly handling
  • Lacklustre interior
  • Petrol engine is slow, thirsty

Read by

Mitsubishi Outlander frontright exterior

Overall verdict

Mitsubishi Outlander front interior

On the inside

Mitsubishi Outlander frontright exterior

Driving

Mitsubishi Outlander gearbox

How much does it cost to run

Mitsubishi Outlander backleft exterior

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"The Outlander is one of the most affordable seven-seat SUVs to come with both four-wheel drive and an automatic gearbox on every model. Yet apart from its spacious interior, it is outclassed by its rivals in every single area worth mentioning, while the hybrid and used diesels have merit, we would avoid the petrol car."

Mitsubishi Outlander frontright exterior

The Outlander is an affordable SUV with a spacious interior and standard four-wheel drive, but in recent years it's been totally eclipsed by its plug-in hybrid sibling, which we've covered in a dedicated review.


The normal model is less of a technological trailblazer, but is a no-nonsense off-roader with seven standard seats and a huge boot. Originally available with a torquey 2.2-litre diesel and choice of manual or automatic six-speed gearboxes, this engine was dropped from the range in 2018, so it’s now powered by a 2.0-litre petrol that comes with a continuously variable auto transmission (CVT); undercutting the PHEV on price.


If you're thinking a wheezy petrol engine seems like an odd choice for a lumbering, heavy off-roader, we'd be inclined to agree with you. The 2.0-litre is gutless, incredibly slow (even before you start to load it up) and its CVT gearbox whines loudly when you try to accelerate, spoiling refinement, frankly it's a very unhappy union.


Despite its stunted performance, the running costs are shockingly high. The low price and cheap insurance is off-set by the engine regularly returning less than 30mpg in traffic, especially if you're carrying five on-board.

Wind and road noise is unacceptably high, and the overly soft springs mean that it rolls and pitches in bends.


The older diesel model was no paragon of refinement, but since the Outlander styles itself as rugged family transport, it suited the character of the car a lot better, with decent towing abilities and reasonable efficiency.


Drive it gently, and it's fairly comfortable at least, and you can tweak the four-wheel drive system to give you more grip on the road, lock the power delivery when you're tackling off-road trails, or disengage to save fuel.

Still, there are more capable alternatives, and while expensive by comparison, you do get what you pay for.


It's one of the longest serving off-roaders on the market, and while it's been tweaked and updated regularly to keep up with its rivals, this veteran status comes with a lot of drawbacks, mostly to the quality of the cabin.

Equipment levels are good, with an 8.0-inch display, heated front seats, and a reversing camera as standard.


However, its dated design and durable but rather crude plastics make the Outlander feel like a budget option. Where the PHEV has low running costs and makes for a cheap company car, the petrol is quite the opposite, and we can't see any reason to choose one over a wide range of talented seven-seat rivals for other brands.


Sure, the Mitsubishi has impressive seating flexibility and a van-like luggage capacity in two-seat mode, but it is so fundamentally hamstrung by its engine and gearbox that literally any other SUV will be easier to drive. If you're looking for an affordable plug-in hybrid, an Outlander PHEV is a fine option, but give this one a miss.


Ready to get your top quality Mitsubishi Outlander?

  • All cars come with a warranty
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  • All quality checked

Mitsubishi Outlander

2.4 Phev Dynamic 5Dr Auto

  • 2019
  • 11,200 miles
  • Delgarth Motor Group Suzuki Milton Keynes
  • Buckinghamshire, MK125RS
Price:£23,495
PCP: £358.01/mo

Representative example: Contract Length: 37 months, 36 Monthly Payments: £358.01, Customer Deposit: £3,524.00, Total Deposit: £3,524.25, Optional Final Payment: £11,236.60, Total Charge For Credit: £4,154.21, Total Amount Payable: £27,649.21, Representative APR: 8.9%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 4.58%, Excess Mileage Charge: 14.9ppm, Mileage Per Annum: 10,000

Mitsubishi Outlander

2.4 PHEV Juro 5dr Auto

  • 2020
  • 25 miles
  • Pentagon Subaru Lincoln
  • Lincolnshire, LN24LD
Price:£26,995
PCP: £445.20/mo

Representative example: Contract Length: 36 months, 35 Monthly Payments: £445.20, Customer Deposit: £4,049.00, Total Deposit: £4,049.25, Optional Final Payment: £11,879.75, Total Charge For Credit: £4,516.00, Total Amount Payable: £31,511.00, Representative APR: 8.9%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 4.36%, Excess Mileage Charge: 13.8ppm, Mileage Per Annum: 10,000

Is the Mitsubishi Outlander right for you?

The conventional Outlander leaves us a little stumped. It's one of the few cars that is genuinely impossible to recommend unless you simply must have an SUV with a Mitsubishi badge on the bonnet, that isn't a hybrid.


The only thing it has going in its favour is the fact that it's one of the cheapest ways to combine a four-wheel drive system, seven-seats, and an automatic gearbox, but boy does it feel like a budget option on the inside.


So as large, basic family transport for people who live in the countryside, we could perhaps see the appeal. Yet why not go for the plug-in hybrid instead? It's faster, has more safety kit, and will be a lot cheaper to run.

Buying it used, with a punchy diesel engine and manual gearbox is a different story, but we'd skip the petrol.


The relative mechanical simplicity of the Outlander, and the proven nature of its engine and gearbox, plus a five-year warranty from new, should make it a hassle free ownership prospect, but then so is a Toyota RAV4.


What’s the best Mitsubishi Outlander model/engine to choose?

For anyone buying a new Outlander, we would strongly recommend you try the plug-in hybrid variant, which we have reviewed separately. While it won't be for everyone, it is a stronger contender than the petrol model.


Truthfully, we can't really recommend that anyone buys the conventionally powered model. It's too slow, very noisy, ruinously expensive to run, and one of the least refined large SUVs on sale, with no redeeming quality.


So instead our recommendation would be to track down a used version with the diesel engine. This gives the car back its identity as a work-horse SUV, with a decent cruising range, strong towing grunt and great value. All Outlanders come well equipped, but if you're buying new then stick with the cheaper Design specification. It gets the key infotainment features you'd want and creature comforts like heated seats and cruise control.


What other cars are similar to the Mitsubishi Outlander?


The surging popularity of SUVs means there are a plethora of seven-seat options at this price. For car-like handling, a stylish cabin and cheap insurance, the Skoda Kodiaq is a great option, well worth the extra cash.


However if you want a bit more passenger space, the Peugeot 5008 has fantastic seating flexibility, a luxury interior and stylish design, plus competitively low running costs if you pick one of the punchy diesel versions. For off-roading, a premium badge and long spec list, look no further than a Land Rover Discovery Sport. This car has class-leading capability in all kinds of terrain, and a recent facelift vastly improved the interior layout.


Still, if you're keen to avoid diesel power, then a five-seat Toyota RAV4 hybrid is a very relaxed performer. It comes with a long warranty, enormous boot, and surprisingly tidy handling, but the potential for over 50mpg.


Learn more

Mitsubishi Outlander front interior

On the inside

Mitsubishi Outlander frontright exterior

Driving

Mitsubishi Outlander gearbox

How much does it cost to run

Mitsubishi Outlander backleft exterior

Prices, versions and specification

Ask the heycar experts: common questions

Is the Mitsubishi Outlander a good car?

The Outlander is an affordable seven-seat SUV with a spacious interior and standard 4x4 drivetrain, and the plug-in hybrid model is a cheap company car, but it feels dated inside.

Andy Brady

Answered by

Andy Brady

Does the Mitsubishi Outlander come with four-wheel drive?

Yes, both the petrol and hybrid versions of the Outlander have four-wheel drive as standard, but the petrol-electric model has road-biased tyres, so it’s not as capable as a Land Rover.

David Ross

Answered by

David Ross

What are the differences between the Outlander PHEV and the standard car?

The standard Outlander has a petrol engine, seven seats, and a CVT automatic gearbox, while the plug-in hybrid pairs a 2.4-litre petrol engine with two electric motors, so it’s a lot more efficient, and quicker than the 2.0-litre petrol, but costs more and only has five seats.

heycar editorial team

Answered by

heycar editorial team

Where is the Mitsubishi Outlander made?

The Japanese brand has factories dotted throughout South East Asia, with the Outlander built in locations in Japan, Malaysia, Taiwan, China, India and even in Russia, near Moscow.

Dan Harrison

Answered by

Dan Harrison

How reliable is a used Mitsubishi Outlander?

The mechanical simplicity of the Outlander and the proven nature of its engine and gearbox, plus a long five-year warranty from new, should mean problems on used cars will be minor, but issues with the infotainment screen and particulate filters on diesel models can occur.

Dan Powell

Answered by

Dan Powell