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Mitsubishi Shogun Review

Mitsubishi Shogun
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Mitsubishi Shogun

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Mitsubishi Shogun

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Mitsubishi Shogun

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Mitsubishi Shogun

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Mitsubishi Shogun

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Mitsubishi Shogun

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Mitsubishi Shogun

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Mitsubishi Shogun

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Mitsubishi Shogun

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1 / 10

heycar review

      Launch year
      2007
      Body type
      SUV
      Fuel type
      Diesel
heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

00/10
heycar rating
Ageing 4x4, hasn’t changed much

Best bits

  • Large, spacious cabin and seven seats
  • Reasonably affordable and most version well equipped
  • Absolutely brilliant off-road

Not so great

  • Pretty agricultural on the Tarmac
  • Can’t match its rivals on interior quality
  • Not enough safety kit by modern standards

Read by

Mitsibushi Shogun 2007 frontright exterior

Overall verdict

Mitsibushi Shogun 2007 front interior

On the inside

Mitsibushi Shogun 2007 backright exterior

Driving

Mitsibushi Shogun 2007 frontright exterior

How much does it cost to run

Mitsibushi Shogun 2007 front grill

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"Amazing what a difference a few years makes, isn’t it? Once upon a time (we’re talking back in the nineties here), the Mitsubishi Shogun was the ultimate must-have accessory for the countryside set."

Mitsibushi Shogun 2007 frontright exterior

Back then, it was one of the few cars on the market that could pull a Palomino-filled horsebox to little Petunia’s gymkhana, with room in the boot for all her tack, while making just the right statement about owning a car solely and specifically for that job. For the green-welly brigade, it was a symbol of membership. For a time.


As the years rolled by, though, the Shogun’s appeal waned. It never lost any of the ability that made it popular - to this day, it’s still unstoppable off-road, hugely practical and impressively durable - it’s just that other cars came along that delivered all those same abilities, but with way more comfort and luxury thrown in, meaning less in the way of compromise. And for the well-heeled folk in question, that temptation was too strong to bear.


But instead of abandoning its roots and trying to compete with newer competition on luxury and comfort, Mitsubishi decided to just keep doing what it had always done. And that means that the Shogun has changed very little over the years. In fact, the car that went off sale reasonably recently in 2019 was hardly any different mechanically to the third-generation car that was released around the turn of the millennium. 


That’s why, the stuff that the Shogun does well, it does as well as ever. It’s brilliant off-road, it’s a fantastic towcar with a strong engine and a pulling capacity of up to 3.5 tonnes, and with a huge cabin and seven seats, it’s enormously practical. It’s solidly built, impressively reliable, comes with a decent amount of standard kit and it’s pretty affordable.


The flipside of Mitsubishi’s approach, though, was that in the areas in which it struggled, it felt more and more out-of-date as the years went.


 In comparison to ever-evolving rivals, ride quality that started off being irritatingly jittery became borderline unbearable, while rolling refinement that was rather rowdy became a downright assault on the senses. Stepping into the cabin, meanwhile, is like stepping back to the 1990s due to the dated nature of its design and materials, and if you compare the safety and infotainment kit available with that available in rivals, there are some very glaring omissions  - automatic emergency braking and Apple Carplay/Android Auto, anyone?


There are still a few hardcore fans kicking about who still love the Shogun for its unapologetic ruggedness and its refusal to dumb down on that in the pursuit of economic success. And for those people, who use their car within a very narrow operating window, it works just fine, thank you very much.


For the majority of today’s SUV buyers, though, who couldn’t give a flying mud-pie about off-roading ability and are far more interested in comfort, luxury, refinement, safety and gadgetry, there are literally dozens of other big 4x4s out there that will suit them better.

Ready to get your top quality Mitsubishi Shogun?

  • All cars come with a warranty
  • Selected dealers only
  • All quality checked

Mitsubishi Shogun

3.2 DI-DC [197] SG3 5dr Auto

  • 2014
  • 44,500 miles
  • Marshall Skoda Harlow
  • Essex, CM202ED
Price:£19,190
HP: £512.36/mo

Representative example: Contract Length: 36 months, 35 Monthly Payments: £512.36, Customer Deposit: £2,878.00, Total Deposit: £2,878.50, Total Charge For Credit: £2,143.46, Total Amount Payable: £21,333.46, Representative APR: 8.5%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 8.47%

Mitsubishi Shogun

3.2 DI-DC SG2 Van

  • 2014
  • 74,364 miles
  • Autoecosse Mitsubishi Dundee
  • Angus, DD48ED
Price (ex VAT):£15,495
HP: £410.22/mo

Representative example: Contract Length: 36 months, 35 Monthly Payments: £410.22, Customer Deposit: £2,324.00, Total Deposit: £2,324.25, Total Charge For Credit: £1,607.17, Total Amount Payable: £17,102.17, Representative APR: 7.9%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 7.59%

Is the Mitsubishi Shogun right for you?

Do you live in the countryside? Do you do lots of countryside-type things? As such, do you need a car that’ll tow a double horsebox over a muddy field without getting stuck, with a boot big enough for saddles, stirrups and whatever else you might think to drape over a nag? If so, the Mitsubishi Shogun could just be the no-nonsense workhorse (sorry) that you’ve been looking for.


It’s impressive off-roading ability, 3500kg towing limit and enormous loadbay make it perfect for just such a job, and with a cabin that’s robust and hardwearing, it should stand up well to such service.


However, before you start thinking that the Shogun is a true alternative to luxurious off-roaders like the Land Rover Discovery or Range Rover, think again. It has nowhere near the comfort, quality, quietness or class to compete in that company.

What's the best Mitsubishi Shogun model/engine to choose?

Well, it’s an easy call on the engine, because despite being on sale for so long, the Shogun was only ever offered with one, a 3.2-litre, four-cylinder diesel. Early on, it was offered with either a manual gearbox or an automatic - both five-speeders - but later examples were auto-only. We never got to try a manual version, but we probably would’ve chosen an automatic anyway, because it suits this kind of car.


The trims available - and what you got with each one - changed fairly regularly throughout the car’s life. Early cars had names like Equippe, Barbarian, Warrior, Diamond and Elegance, while later cars were less imaginative, being called SG2, SG3, SG4 and SG5. We reckon you want a lower-mid-range trim like the SG3 trim to give the best balance between kit and affordability.

What other cars are similar to the Mitsubishi Shogun?

As a rufty-tufty, go-anywhere, seven-seat off-roader, you can’t ignore the Land Rover Discovery, although it should be noted that the Disco costs a big slice more than the Shogun. A more direct rival these days would be the Ssangyong Rexton: big, brash, seven seats, capable in the rough stuff, will tow just about anything you need it to, and it’s similar on price.


If you’re in less need of rugged off-roading ability, and you just want an affordable seven-seat SUV, then you’ll probably be looking at options including the Kia Sorento, Hyundai Santa Fe and the Skoda Kodiaq. If off-roading is the priority and seven seats aren’t, then the long-wheelbase Jeep Wrangler and Land Rover Defender will be in the mix, too

Learn more

Mitsibushi Shogun 2007 front interior

On the inside

Mitsibushi Shogun 2007 backright exterior

Driving

Mitsibushi Shogun 2007 frontright exterior

How much does it cost to run

Mitsibushi Shogun 2007 front grill

Prices, versions and specification