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Nissan Juke Review

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heycar review

      Launch year
      2020
      Body type
      Crossover
      Fuel type
      Petrol
heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

00/10
heycar rating
Better than the old Juke

Best bits

  • Smart interior
  • Loaded with clever safety technology
  • Good value for money

Not so great

  • Just the one engine available (and it’s not that great)
  • Still not the most spacious choice
  • The most affordable models are very basic

Read by

Nissan Juke front

Overall verdict

Nissan Juke 2020 front interior

On the inside

Nissan Juke road driving

Driving

Nissan Juke side profile

How much does it cost to run

Nissan Juke 2020 central console

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict on the Nissan Juke

"The old Nissan Juke was distinctly average yet still sold very well, so it almost doesn’t matter how good the latest model is. Fortunately, it’s pretty good. The interior feels well-finished, and it’s more practical than ever. It’s better than the old Juke to drive, too, although its appeal is limited by only being offered with just one engine choice."

Nissan Juke front

The old Nissan Juke sold by the bucketload despite having looks only a mother could love and an interior like a reverse Tardis. After 10 years on sale and with an increasing amount of competition, Nissan finally introduced the second-generation model.


The next-gen Nissan Juke is better. Much better. It still looks a bit quirky (you can decide if that’s a good or bad thing), but the interior is more spacious and it’s taken a significant step up in terms of quality. No more does the Juke’s cabin look woefully plasticky and clumsily designed - it now feels relatively plush and looks pretty stylish too.


It’s also easy to get comfortable in the latest Juke. Not everyone could get comfy in the old model, thanks to a steering wheel that only moved up and down (rather than in and out). There’s plenty of adjustment in both the wheel and driver’s seat, now, so most people will be able to find a driving position that suits.


There’s significantly more space for rear-seat passengers, although the Juke’s curvaceous design means you’d be better looking elsewhere if you regularly carry people in the back. This is intended as a stylish city car, not a replacement for your family Ford Focus. Still, the boot’s pretty big - 20% larger than the old model, in fact.


At the time of writing, Nissan only offers the Juke with one engine. That’s a little three-cylinder 1.0-litre petrol unit providing 117PS - similar to the 115PS 1.0-litre engine used in the likes of the SEAT Arona. Don’t dismiss it based on its size, as it’s up to the job of dragging the Juke up to speed. It’s not particularly refined, though, and soon starts to feel out of its depth on the motorway.


Nissan’s dismissed the idea of introducing a diesel engine to the Juke range. There isn’t going to be a four-wheel-drive version, either, so if you plan on taking your crossover further than the local supermarket, you’ll need to look elsewhere.


There will be a hybrid at some point. For now, the only choice you get is whether you want a manual or automatic gearbox. Both are fine, although the manual gear change doesn’t feel as slick as some competitors. The automatic’s a dual-clutch transmission, which is infinitely better than the CVT gearbox used in the old Juke.


It’s an easy car to drive around town, helped by a high seating position which gives you a clear view of the road ahead. High-spec models come with a 360-degree camera which helps when parking, too. On the open road, rivals are more refined, and the Ford Puma and SEAT Arona both feel more agile.


So, if you’re wondering about buying a first- or second-generation Juke, the answer is clear. The latest model is considerably better in almost every way, with a more practical and upmarket interior. It’s a shame, though, that the initial engine line-up is very limited and it’s pretty average to drive.


If you're looking for the older version, you need our Nissan Juke (2011-2019) review.


Is the Nissan Juke right for you?

If you want a stylish crossover, the Nissan Juke is a pretty good choice. It’s an easier car to justify than before thanks to its improved interior, but its (very) limited engine line-up limits its appeal. Still, if you mainly drive around town or you’re not fussed about effortless performance, you could certainly do worse. You could buy the old model.


What’s the best Nissan Juke model/engine to choose?

There’s only one engine to choose from. The automatic gearbox makes for more relaxed driving, although the manual’s fine if you’re on a budget or prefer to be in control. We’d avoid the cheapest Visia model as it’s very basic, while higher-spec models start to get quite expensive. An Acenta or N-Connecta model is probably the sweet spot in the range.

What other cars are similar to the Nissan Juke?

While the Nissan Juke was a pioneer of the small crossover market, the segment is now flooded with some very competent competition. If you’re considering the Juke, you should also look at the latest Renault Captur. It shares a platform with the Juke, but has less divisive styling and a wider selection of engines to choose from.


The latest Peugeot 2008 is another really good alternative, with a bold interior, while the Ford Puma is the compact crossover of choice for people who enjoy driving. Volkswagen Group has some very strong rivals in the form of the Skoda Kamiq, Volkswagen T-Roc (and smaller T-Cross), and the SEAT Arona. The Citroen C3 Aircross is a comfortable choice, meanwhile, while the Honda HR-V is a very versatile option - although it feels a bit dated alongside newer alternatives.


Learn more

Nissan Juke 2020 front interior

On the inside

Nissan Juke road driving

Driving

Nissan Juke side profile

How much does it cost to run

Nissan Juke 2020 central console

Prices, versions and specification

Ask the heycar experts: common questions

When did they stop making the Nissan Juke?

The original Nissan Juke was replaced in 2019.

Dan Harrison

Answered by

Dan Harrison

Are Nissan Jukes good on fuel?

The Nissan Juke is good on fuel for an SUV, but a small car will be even cheaper to run.

Keith Moody

Answered by

Keith Moody

Does a Nissan Juke hold its value?

The Nissan Juke will hold it's value better than a normal small car thanks to its desirable SUV body style

Russell Campbell

Answered by

Russell Campbell

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