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Peugeot Boxer Review

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Peugeot Boxer

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heycar review

      Launch year
      2006
      Body type
      Van
      Fuel type
      Diesel
heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

00/10
heycar rating
Old fashioned and basic workhorse

Best bits

  • Strong diesel engines
  • Excellent warranty
  • Huge range of shapes and sizes available

Not so great

  • Noisy engines
  • Outdated cabin
  • Passenger bench seat not comfortable on longer trips

Read by

Peugeot Boxer Front View

Overall verdict

Peugeot Boxer Front Interior

On the inside

Peugeot Boxer Right View

Driving

Peugeot Boxer Inside Van

How much does it cost to run

Peugeot Boxer Side View

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"The Peugeot Boxer is a bit of an old workhorse in many senses. It has been around in its current form since 2006, although it has had several updates in that time to freshen things up."

Peugeot Boxer Front View

However, the fundamentals remain largely the same. Given that those include an impressively wide range of body styles, some strong payloads and some powerful engines, it is not hard to see why it has remained popular with buyers and Peugeot has persevered with it for so long.


The Boxer was originally co-developed with Citroen and Fiat, meaning that there are plenty of parts that are shared with the Relay and the Ducato respectively. The Boxer has had plenty of different engines over its lengthy life, but as of the 2019 update it is offered with just the two diesel engines – a pair of 2.2-litre units with 120PS or 140PS.


There have been plenty of tweaks to the engine ranges in its lengthy history, though. In 2016 Peugeot brought in a Euro6 compliant 2.0-litre HDi, which replaced Euro 5 2.2-litre and 3.0-litre HDi diesels. The Boxer has even been around long enough that the early versions featured Euro 4 diesels.


The Boxer’s age means that it lags behind other large vans when it comes to the overall refinement and driving experience. The lack of insulation and the relatively gruff engines mean there is a fair amount of noise while you are on the move and the cabin feels less geared towards comfort than more modern rivals. It does the basics well, though, as the suspension is well controlled and the Boxer handles with a reassurance that will have kept customers coming back time and again.


One of the big selling points for the Boxer is its versatility and the wide range of different versions that are and have been available. There are dropside and tipper conversions, chassis cabs, Luton vans, crew vans and minibuses all available. These come through Peugeot’s ‘Built for Business’ program, so you get the manufacturer’s backup and can deal with them directly rather than having to head off to a third-party converter.


The standard panel van comes with plenty of practicality, with four heights and three lengths available. This means there is up to 17 cubic metres of space on offer, while the payloads go up to a hefty 1570kg. 


To help you make the most of this practicality there are touches such as rear doors that have multiple opening positions. They swing out to 90 degrees as standard, but a retractable link system lets you move them out to 180 degrees while you can also have doors that open out to 270 degrees to lie flat with the side of the van as an option.


The floor is ribbed as standard and you can get either eight or 10 lashing hooks to ensure everything is tied down securely, while there are black Teflon plastic lined panels in the rear which act to protect the load.


It’s not the most modern or the most luxurious but many will want their large van to be a tool above everything else and the Boxer shines in many of the areas that count. 

Ready to get your top quality Peugeot Boxer?

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  • All quality checked

Peugeot Boxer

2.2 BlueHDi H2 Asphalt Van 140ps

  • 2020
  • 2,541 miles

Manufacturer Approved

  • Robins And Day Peugeot Morden
  • Surrey, SW193BZ
Price:£25,990
PCP: £512.43/mo

Representative example: Contract Length: 36 months, 35 Monthly Payments: £512.43, Customer Deposit: £3,898.00, Total Deposit: £3,898.50, Optional Final Payment: £8,595.00, Total Charge For Credit: £4,438.55, Total Amount Payable: £30,428.55, Representative APR: 9.9%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 9.9%, Excess Mileage Charge: 12.5ppm, Mileage Per Annum: 10,000

Peugeot Boxer

2.0 BlueHDi H2 Professional Van 130ps

  • 2018
  • 55,738 miles
  • Charles Hurst Van Centre
  • Antrim, BT126LR
Price (ex VAT):£14,995
HP: £391.75/mo

Representative example: Contract Length: 36 months, 36 Monthly Payments: £391.75, Customer Deposit: £2,249.00, Total Deposit: £2,249.25, Total Charge For Credit: £1,357.25, Total Amount Payable: £16,352.25, Representative APR: 6.9%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 3.55%

Is the Peugeot Boxer right for you?

The reasons for buying a Boxer are very much the ones that will appeal to the head rather than the heart. It is a big van that will carry a lot of stuff and it will be relatively efficient while you drive around with all that stuff in the back.


Rivals are more comfortable, more modern and much more refined, but the Boxer is like a tool – it’s basic but very good at doing what it was originally designed to do when it first launched all those years ago. That’s why it is still largely unchanged after such a long time and what it remains popular.

What's the best Peugeot Boxer model/engine to choose?

Many will buy the Boxer with functionality the first priority so will just look to keep costs as cheap as possible, but the difference in cost between the basic S trim and the mid-range Professional is small enough that it is worth making the step.


The extra kit includes air conditioning, cruise control, lumbar support on the driver’s seat and satellite navigation for a relatively low financial upgrade.


If you don’t need the bigger models then the 120PS engine is still capable of carrying a large payload. If you want anything other than the shortest and lowest model you have no choice but to upgrade to the more powerful engine, which brings a notable upgrade in price.

What other vans are similar to the Peugeot Boxer?

There are almost two distinct classes in the large van category, with the Boxer closest in style and function to the likes of the Fiat Ducato and Citroen Relay with which it shares many of its parts. The equally ageing Renault Master and its siblings – the Nissan NV400 and Vauxhall Movano – are also worth considering as basic workhorses.


The more modern Ford Transit, Mercedes-Benz Sprinter and the Volkswagen Crafter all offer a greater degree of refinement and technology.


Learn more

Peugeot Boxer Front Interior

On the inside

Peugeot Boxer Right View

Driving

Peugeot Boxer Inside Van

How much does it cost to run

Peugeot Boxer Side View

Prices, versions and specification