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Porsche 911 Review

Porsche 911
Porsche 911
Porsche 911
Porsche 911
Porsche 911
Porsche 911
Porsche 911
Porsche 911
Porsche 911
Porsche 911
Porsche 911

1/10

Porsche 911

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Porsche 911

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Porsche 911

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Porsche 911

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Porsche 911

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Porsche 911

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Porsche 911

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Porsche 911

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Porsche 911

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1 / 10

heycar review

      Launch year
      2019
      Body type
      Performance
      Fuel type
      Petrol
00/10
heycar rating
Enduring, iconic useable sports car

Best bits

  • An incredibly capable all-round sports car
  • Instantly recognisable and hugely desirable 
  • Its usability doesn’t come at the expense of driver engagement, it still among the best there is 

Not so great

  • With every generation it’s gotten ever-bigger, this one feels it on the road
  • If you’re an Android user you’ll need to buy an iPhone, Porsche only does Apple CarPlay
  • Extensive and expensive options are required to make it as brilliant as it can be 

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Porsche 911 Front View

Overall verdict

Porsche 911 Front Interior

On the inside

Porsche 911 Rear View

Driving

Porsche 911 Front View

How much does it cost to run

Porsche 911 Right Side View

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"The Porsche 911 is the world’s most enduring and recognisable sports car."

Porsche 911 Front View

It has been around since 1963, Porsche continually evolving its evergreen sports car, not just for the road, but for racetracks globally, where it’s won in every category it’s ever been raced in. From Le Mans to Daytona, to your garage then, the Carrera name itself means race in Spanish, while the Targa badge – affixed to the folding hardtop version – celebrates Porsche’s success with the 911 in the legendary Targa Florio race in the 1970s.


Its success hasn’t just been on the race track, the 911 having sold over 1 million examples since the 60s, with the current 911 Carrera, described as the 992 model, having been introduced in 2019. It’s the eighth generation of 911, and like its predecessors it’s offered in a variety of guises, in coupe, cabriolet and Targa body styles, with rear- or four-wheel drive, in standard Carrera, Carrera S or range-topping Turbo S forms. 


To that already extensive line-up Porsche will add a GTS trim, as well as more focussed track-biased models from its Motorsport division, badged GT3 and GT3 RS – these different enough to warrant their own review. On occasion Porsche produces other special editions and models, too, celebrating significant anniversaries, dropping weight, adding power and all sating collectors’ desires for low volume, often numbered models. 


The latest special is the Targa 4S Heritage Edition, but history is littered with evocative 911 badges like R, T, Sport Classic, Speedster and GT2 RS among others, which Porsche occasionally re-visits and re-invents. 


To the standard myriad of possibilities the Carrera S can be had with a manual transmission, other options across the line-up sharpening up further how your 911 drives, with cost options like the Sport Chrono Package, Sports Chassis, PCCB (Porsche Carbon Ceramic Brakes), PDCC (Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control) all allowing you to tailor your 911 to however you want it. 


Power for the standard 911 Carrera is 385PS, from a turbocharged 3.0-litre flat-six engine, with the Carrera S upping that output to 450PS. At the top end of the 911 pile is the Turbo S, which has a 3.8-litre turbocharged engine that delivers an incredible 650PS output and levels of performance that was once the exclusive preserve of hypercars. 


Even with that surfeit of power, the Turbo S retains the usability of its Carrera relations, the 911’s enduring success largely down to its unusual usefulness against its sports car contemporaries. A 2+2, with a pair of, admittedly small, rear seats you can get children in the back seats, of fold the seatbacks and use the space for additional luggage capacity. 


The 911’s engine configuration of being a flat, boxer unit, and its positioning in the rear, behind the rear wheels facilitates that good-sized cabin, as well as allowing a deep luggage compartment under the front bonnet. 


That unusual engine position did, with early 911s, make them tricky, demanding cars to drive quickly, earning the 911 a reputation as a proper, exciting drivers’ car, which took talent to exploit its performance. With every generation Porsche’s engineers have made it ever easier to drive and more surefooted and predictable, but they’ve done so without sacrificing the core driver appeal that makes the 911, any 911 an absolute joy to drive.    


The consummate all-rounder, the Porsche 911’s enduring appeal is largely thanks to its huge bandwidth, not just in performance and capability, but also its usability. And that’s rare in this class. It’s a sports car, then, but one with GT and supercar genes in the mix, it driving exceptionally, looking sensational and being beautifully built, too. 


If you're looking for the older version, you need our Porsche 911 (2015-2019) review.


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Porsche 911

GT3 RS 2dr PDK

  • 2018
  • 1,757 miles

Manufacturer Approved

  • Dick Lovett Porsche Tewkesbury
  • Gloucestershire, GL208ND
Price:£191,991
PCP: £2,725.94/mo

Representative example: Contract Length: 36 months, 35 Monthly Payments: £2,725.94, Customer Deposit: £28,798.00, Total Deposit: £28,798.65, Optional Final Payment: £93,751.25, Total Charge For Credit: £25,966.80, Total Amount Payable: £217,957.80, Representative APR: 6.9%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 6.9%, Excess Mileage Charge: 48.24ppm, Mileage Per Annum: 10,000

Is the Porsche 911 right for you?

The 911’s enduring success is in no part because it’s right for you, and for everyone else. There really is a 911 to suit anyone, from the most basic Carrera right up to the awesome performance offered by the Turbo S, be it closed in coupe form, open as a conventional cabriolet, or as a Targa – the Targa not offered in range-topping Turbo (capital T, all 911s being turbocharged these days) form. 


There’s the Carrera 4 if you want your 911 a bit more surefooted, rear-wheel drive if you’re more of a purist, likewise the availability of a manual with the Carrera S, Most buyers go for the ease and speed of Porsche’s PDK paddle-shifted eight-speed automatic transmission, though. 


The Turbo and Turbo S are all four-wheel drive and PDK, and for all the sensational performance on offer from all the comfortable, connected, upmarket interior makes the 911 a consummate GT car, or a practical, easy daily driver.   

What’s the best Porsche 911 model/engine to choose?

With performance ranging from spectacular, to other-worldly in that Turbo S, it’s down to your expectations and, ultimately budget. Prices range from Just over £80,000 for a 911 Carrera to nearly double that for the Turbo S. That’s before any options, of which there are plenty to pick from, this level of sports car buying very much in the same vein as bespoke tailoring, so you can easily add 10-20%, or even more, to your 911’s price by adding options. 


For the purest driving experience then a Carrera S with a manual gearbox and sports chassis is absolutely sublime while for head-turning looks and the choice of open or closed the Targa is difficult to beat. A Carrera 4 or 4S with a ski rack on the roof is the perfect shuttle for your ski trips, while if you want rock-solid high-speed stability and eye-widening acceleration then the Turbo S will take you to 200mph and beyond with impunity. All are very good at everything though, but just how good depends entirely on how you specify it.       


What other cars are similar to the Porsche 911?

The 911 model line-up has such breadth you really can pitch it against anything from things like the higher performance Jaguar F-Types for the Carreras, right up to V12 Ferraris and Lamborghinis in its fastest 911 Turbo S form.


Obvious rivals include the Aston Martin Vantage, any of the V8 Ferraris, McLaren 540/570C and McLaren 600LT to the Lamborghini Huracan. To that lot you can add the Nissan GT-R and things like Audi R8s, Mercedes AMG GT,the Honda NSX and plenty more. 


Indeed, the 911’s range of ability pitches it against some more grand touring cars, too, so you might have one instead of a Bentley Continental GT or something like a BMW M8. Much to every other manufacturer’s chagrin with the 911 Porsche pretty much has an answer to any sports/GT/super car question.   


Learn more

Porsche 911 Front Interior

On the inside

Porsche 911 Rear View

Driving

Porsche 911 Front View

How much does it cost to run

Porsche 911 Right Side View

Prices, versions and specification

Ask the heycar experts: common questions

How many different body styles are there of the 911?

Although the 911 started its life as a two-door coupe, Porsche soon capitalised on its success by introducing a targa (with a removal roof section and glass rear screen) and then a cabriolet version in 1983, and it has sold 911 convertibles ever since.

heycar editorial team

Answered by

heycar editorial team

Which is the best version of the 911?

This question really depends on what you want from your sports car. The standard Carrera is a brilliant all-rounder. For track drivers, the motorsport-inspired GT3 is the ultimate 911, and limited edition versions like the 911R are excellent investments.

Andy Brady

Answered by

Andy Brady

What does the 911 in the name stand for?

Originally, Porsche wanted to call its 911 the 901 - its internal codename - but French brand Peugeot protested that it owned the rights to that name. Rather than rebrand for just one market, Porsche swapped a number and an icon was born.

David Ross

Answered by

David Ross