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Porsche Panamera Review

Porsche Panamera
Porsche Panamera
Porsche Panamera
Porsche Panamera
Porsche Panamera
Porsche Panamera
Porsche Panamera
Porsche Panamera
Porsche Panamera
Porsche Panamera
Porsche Panamera

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Porsche Panamera

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Porsche Panamera

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Porsche Panamera

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Porsche Panamera

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Porsche Panamera

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Porsche Panamera

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Porsche Panamera

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Porsche Panamera

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Porsche Panamera

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heycar review

      Launch year
      2016
      Body type
      Luxury
      Fuel type
      Petrol, Diesel, Hybrid
heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

00/10
heycar rating
Porsche’s fast, capable luxury car

Best bits

  • Very enjoyable and rewarding to drive, all are fast, the some being incredibly so 
  • The interior is beautifully finished  
  • Plug-in hybrids offer useful electric-only range

Not so great

  • Still a design that splits opinion
  • The ventilation control via a touchscreen is needlessly complicated 
  • The list price is just the start, you need to spend a lot on optional equipment 

Read by

Porsche Panamera Right Side View

Overall verdict

Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo Front Interior

On the inside

Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo Front View

Driving

Porsche Panamera Built-in Sat Nav

How much does it cost to run

Porsche Panamera Left Side View

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"Porsche describes the Panamera as a sports car, and behind the wheel there’s credibility to that claim, with all having a clearly defined driver focus. They’re more multi-dimensional at the same time, too, with real ability as a big grand tourer, and those plug-in hybrids offer useful electric-only range to salve your environmental conscience, and, being honest here, slashing your tax bills."

Porsche Panamera Right Side View

The Porsche Panamera is Porsche’s take on a luxury sporting saloon, the sports car company adding the Panamera to its showrooms in 2009, alongside the Cayenne SUV, Boxster and 911 model line-ups. The current Porsche Panamera is the second series and arrived in 2017.


Unsurprisingly, it’s a more sporting spin on the luxury saloon, with its large hatchback opening it’s not, technically, a saloon, instead more of a fastback. 


That, and its obvious driver focus, does mean it’s a difficult model to pigeonhole, as the Panamera’s breadth of ability covers everything from conventional luxury saloons like the BMW 7 Series or Mercedes-Benz S-Class, while also offering performance alternatives to sporting saloons and four-door coupes like the BMW M5, Mercedes-AMG E63S, Maserati Quattroporte, Mercedes-AMG CLS 63 and Audi RS7 Sportback. Since 2017 Porsche has offered the Panamera as a Sport Turismo, or estate to use normal parlance.    


A diesel was offered in the line-up, but that was quietly dropped, leaving all current Panamera models to feature petrol engines. For the more environmentally conflicted Porsche owners out there there’s a pair of Panameras that are plug-in hybrids, these offer not just the potential for moderate range electric-only driving, but a significant boost to the petrol engine’s performance. Indeed, the range-topping, fastest model in the Panamera range is a Turbo S E-hybrid, which has a combined output of 680PS from its 4.0-litre twin-turbocharged V8 petrol and electric motor. 


That flagship might offer the mightiest performance, but no Panamera is slow, with even the entry-level Panamera 4 able to offer excellent pace. That Panamera 4 is, as the number suggests, four-wheel drive, all Panameras driving all four wheels. It’s not just the Panamera’s ability to gather speed that’s appealing, either, but its means of exploiting it, the Panamera driving very well, with an agile, engaging chassis that’ll appeal to more demanding drivers than many of its rivals. 


There are compromises as a result, it’s not as cosseting and wafting as the best of its luxury saloon rivals, while space in the rear is nowhere near as generous – the UK no longer offered the Executive model, which stretched the wheelbase by 150mm – but on the right road, the Panamera, in any form, is an incredibly capable, high-performance car. 


In its current form it’s been around since 2017, and there’ll be a range of mid-life revisions to the Panamera coming in 2020. Expect improvements in engine performance, in relation to both economy and emissions, as well as power, as well are revisions to standard equipment and a moderately refreshed style.


Porsche also offers an 'estate' as such, with the Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo.

Ready to get your top quality Porsche Panamera?

  • All cars come with a warranty
  • Selected dealers only
  • All quality checked

Porsche Panamera

2.9 V6 4S E-Hybrid 5dr PDK

  • 2020
  • 6,102 miles

Manufacturer Approved

  • Dick Lovett Porsche Cardiff
  • Glamorgan, CF118TW
Price:£114,990
PCP: £1,811.65/mo

Representative example: Contract Length: 36 months, 35 Monthly Payments: £1,811.65, Customer Deposit: £17,248.00, Total Deposit: £17,248.50, Optional Final Payment: £49,220.00, Total Charge For Credit: £14,886.25, Total Amount Payable: £129,876.25, Representative APR: 6.9%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 6.9%, Excess Mileage Charge: 33.84ppm, Mileage Per Annum: 10,000

Is the Porsche Panamera right for you?

There’s a Panamera for every type of buyer in the luxury and sports saloon marketplace, with the possible exception of someone after a car to be chauffeured in – it’s not hugely accommodating in the back seats. 


There’s plenty of space for children, though, so if you’ve grown out of trying to squeeze the kids into your 911 Carrera then the Panamera represents the next best option for you. It really does live up to Porsche’s sports car billing, too, with big performance from all, allied to real driver engagement, so if you’re the type of driver who now needs more space than a sports car, but doesn’t really want any compromises behind the wheel, then the Panamera is a very compelling buy indeed.

What’s the best Porsche Panamera model/engine to choose?

They’re all very good, but some models are a little bit better in particular areas than others, which would impact our recommendation. The GTS is a good-looking, more driver-focussed and equipped model that’s a little bit less outrageous in its performance compared to the Turbo. 


Being the ‘entry’ level Panamera that 4 is the least expensive model, with prices starting from around £73,000, it’s quick, understated and fun, so you’d not feel in any way short-changed by it.


Above that there’s the 440PS 4S model, while the Panamera 4 E-Hybrid delivers near GTS levels of performance allied to a useful electric-only driving range of, in real-world use, about 15 miles, which makes it a fine, all-rounder if you live in the city and have a shortish commute. That plug-in hybrid does lose some of its ultimate driver appeal thanks to the weight of the hybrid system, but it’s marginal, so it’s the one we’d happily live with either it, or that GTS.

What other cars are similar to the Porsche Panamera?

The spread of potential rivals for the Panamera is wide, and varied, with everything from Mercedes-Benz S-Class in its more moderately powered forms, to the plug-in hybrids and AMG models. 


The Mercedes-AMG E63 S and the CLS 63 S are also credible alternatives to the highest performance Panameras, as are cars like the BMW M5 and Maserati’s Quattroporte. You might choose an Audi A8 or A7 Sportback or its Audi RS7 alternative, while a Bentley Flying Spur might also be on your list of potential buys instead of a Panamera. The Aston Martin Rapide fills much the same brief as the Panamera, too, though it’s recently finished production, as do many plug-in saloons like the BMW 5 Series, BMW 7 Series, Mercedes-Benz E-Class and more besides. 

Learn more

Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo Front Interior

On the inside

Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo Front View

Driving

Porsche Panamera Built-in Sat Nav

How much does it cost to run

Porsche Panamera Left Side View

Prices, versions and specification