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SEAT Mii Electric Review 2021

heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

SEAT Mii
SEAT Mii

1/10

1 / 10

00/10
heycar rating
"Sensible second life for Mii"
  • Launched: 2020
  • City car
  • EV

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Quick overview

Pros

  • Electric driving experience is hassle-free and fun
  • Relatively cheap to buy, peanuts to run
  • Better than a petrol car in the city

Cons

  • Range is less than some rivals
  • Cabin feeling its age
  • Lack of options

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SEAT Mii Electric Review 2021 Front Side View

Overall verdict

SEAT Mii Electric Review 2021 Front Interior

On the inside

SEAT Mii Electric Review 2021 Front View

Driving

SEAT Mii Electric Review 2021 Charging Point

Cost to run

SEAT Mii Electric Review 2021 Right Side View

Prices and Specs

Common questions

Common questions

Overall verdict on the SEAT Mii Electric

"The SEAT Mii Electric is a little let down by the age of the car on which it’s based, but the upside of that is this is a relatively inexpensive way into electric motoring with all the advantages that brings. It’s fun to drive, still stylish and preferable in many ways to the petrol equivalent."

SEAT Mii Electric Review 2021 Front Side View

If the SEAT Mii Electric looks a bit familiar, your eyes are not deceiving you. This is the SEAT Mii - the city car that was first introduced in 2012 - just not as you know it. 


After a pretty successful period of seven years on sale, SEAT (and its sister brands) took the executive decision to stop selling the Mii with any petrol engine options and make it electric-only. So what you’re seeing here is the Mii reborn, appealing to people who want an electric car that doesn’t look like a space shuttle and city car buyers who don’t need to travel 200 miles in one go. Simply put, It's one of the best small electric cars you can buy, and we'll explain all in our SEAT Mii Electric review.


As with the original Mii, SEAT Mii Electric is one third of a triumvirate that includes the Volkswagen e-Up and the Skoda Citigo-e iV. The original Mii, Up and Citigo were all introduced with a near-identical range of petrol engines and other oily bits, with just equipment levels and price to differentiate them. Now the Mii and its e-Up and Citigo-e iV siblings are all being sold in revised electric form, with only the Volkswagen Up still available with a petrol engine .


There’s very little to distinguish the SEAT Mii Electric from the regular Mii on which it is based - other than discreet badges on the front doors. It’s still as boxy as you can get whilst obeying some key aerodynamic principles in order to provide as much space as possible inside. There’s a near-vertical tailgate which makes for easy reversing as well as maximising boot space, while the overhangs are as short as possible. It’s a relatively old design now, but the SEAT Mii Electric is still a handsome one, particularly in the right colour with smart alloy wheels fitted.


It’s a familiar story inside too, with much of the Mii’s cabin carried over from the outgoing version to the SEAT Mii Electric. There’s still a big glazed area that helps the feeling of space and gives good visibility, helped by the slim dashboard. All the major controls are grouped closely together in the centre, but the SEAT Mii Electric does without a central touchscreen like you get in the Renault Zoe, and using your smartphone to connect music, phone and navigation to the car all seems a little last decade in comparison.


There are no drivetrain options as such for the SEAT Mii Electric. You get an electric motor that can deliver up to 83PS and 212Nm of torque, with a continuous power output of 55PS (the 83PS is only available for short bursts of acceleration) and a single-speed automatic gearbox driving the front wheels. 


The battery pack is 36.8kWh, which gives the Mii Electric a WLTP range of 161 miles. Driving the Mii Electric couldn’t be easier - there’s lots of torque for quick acceleration from low speeds, and you can adjust the amount of regenerative braking so you can use the brake pedal less. The rest of the SEAT Mii Electric's driving experience is as per the original Mii, but arguably better. It’s quieter, just as comfortable and even more relaxing - as well as being cheaper to run too. 


The SEAT Mii Electric makes a strong case for itself as an alternative to a petrol-powered city car. It costs a fair amount more to buy in the first place, but for city dwellers that can take advantage of fast charging, no congestion charging and dedicated parking spots, it could add up to a wise move. The SEAT Mii Electric is one of the cheapest electric cars you can buy and one of the best.


If you're looking for the standard petrol version, you need our SEAT Mii (2012-2020) review.


Is the SEAT Mii Electric right for you?

The SEAT Mii Electric is blissfully easy to drive, and its low noise and easy performance are well-matched by the quick steering and comfortable ride to make it a brilliant car for zipping in and out of the city. Low running costs are a big plus too, once you get past the initial cost. Anyone seeking a top-drawer city car should consider the SEAT Mii Electric, and depending on how often you need to go out of town it may well be handy enough to perform that job too.

What’s the best SEAT Mii Electric model to choose?

SEAT has tried to keep the list price of the Mii Electric as low as possible by cutting out the trims and options. There’s just a single model in the range - the Mii Electric - and outside of the colour of the exterior paint there are just three options: the mode 2 charging cable, the Easy Flex pack which adds the double boot floor, a glovebox hook and a height-adjustable passenger seat for £70 and a contrast roof, which is available on all body colour bar black (of course).


That makes for an easy decision when buying new or used, although you may want to compare prices and deals with the Skoda and Volkswagen equivalents.

What other cars are similar to the SEAT Mii Electric?

No cars are more similar to the SEAT Mii Electric than the Volkswagen e-Up and Skoda Citigo-e iV, so you should definitely consider both options before making a choice. The Citigo-e is available in two trim levels, one significantly cheaper than the Mii Electric with less equipment and the other almost identical in price and spec. The e-Up is also a one-model range, and true to form is the most expensive of the three.


The other main rival to the SEAT Mii Electric is the Renault Zoe. Although it is a slightly bigger car and a more expensive with it, it comes in a choice of two power outputs, two charging modes and three trim levels, so it’s easier to pick the car you need. Also consider the retro Honda e.

Learn more

SEAT Mii Electric Review 2021 Front Interior

On the inside

SEAT Mii Electric Review 2021 Front View

Driving

SEAT Mii Electric Review 2021 Charging Point

Cost to run

SEAT Mii Electric Review 2021 Right Side View

Prices and Specs

Common questions

Common questions

Ask the heycar experts: common questions

Is the SEAT Mii Electric a good car?

If you're looking for a hassle-free small car for short trips, then the SEAT Mii Electric is a good buy. The electric range isn't the greatest, but should be more than enough for a lot of city dwellers, while the clever use of space in the cabin means it's relatively large for its small dimensions.

Phil Hall

Answered by

Phil Hall

Is the SEAT Mii Electric the same as the VW e-Up?

The SEAT Mii Electric, Volkswagen e-Up and Skoda Citigo-e iV are essentially the same car. They are mechanically identical, with the only differences coming down to slightly different styling elements and interior details. The VW e-Up is probably the more premium of the three, the Skoda Citigo-e iV the most affordable and the SEAT Mii Electric the most stylish.

Russell Campbell

Answered by

Russell Campbell

How many seats does the SEAT Mii Electric have?

The SEAT Mii Electric is strictly a four-seater, with only two seatbelts in the rear of the car. If you need space for three people in the back and want a small electric car, check out the Renault Zoe.

Phil Hall

Answered by

Phil Hall

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