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Skoda Citigo Review

heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

Skoda Citigo
Skoda Citigo
Skoda Citigo
Skoda Citigo
Skoda Citigo
Skoda Citigo
Skoda Citigo
Skoda Citigo
Skoda Citigo
Skoda Citigo
Skoda Citigo

1/10

Skoda Citigo

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Skoda Citigo

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Skoda Citigo

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Skoda Citigo

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Skoda Citigo

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Skoda Citigo

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Skoda Citigo

8/10

Skoda Citigo

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Skoda Citigo

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1 / 10

00/10
heycar rating
"Good value, a smart buy"
  • Launched: 2012
  • City car
  • Petrol

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Quick overview

Pros

  • A quality item despite the low price
  • Comfortable with good ride quality
  • Peanuts to run, low depreciation too

Cons

  • Rubbish automatic option
  • 75PS engine on top spec trim only
  • No chance of three passengers across the back

Skoda Citigo cars for sale on heycar

102
Number of cars available
£4.9K - £21K
Price bracket of these cars
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Colours available on heycar
5 doors3 doors
Door options available

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Skoda Citigo

Overall verdict

Skoda Citigo Front Interior

On the inside

Skoda Citigo Rear View

Driving

Skoda Citigo Rim

Cost to run

Skoda Citigo Electric Infotainment

Prices and Specs

Overall verdict

"As with the rest of Skoda’s output stretching back as far as the early 1990s, the Citigo was part of a joint project with Spanish brand SEAT and parent company Volkswagen, each of whom also launched a contender in the city car class at in the same period."

Skoda Citigo

These brilliant city cars were created together to share the design and development costs to create something more sophisticated than the competition, with maximum cabin space and a grown-up feel while still being easy to drive and cheap to run. 


The Citigo has the body structure, mechanicals and basic interior layout as the Volkswagen Up and SEAT Mii, while the exterior is basically the same with some detail changes to distinguish the three. As is typically the way within the Volkswagen Group of brands, the Skoda take on things is to prioritise value, and frequently the Citigo was the cheapest contender of the three when compared model-for-model.


You don’t have to be a car designer to understand the Citigo from the outside. It’s not a million miles from being a rectangular cuboid, with only the sloping windscreen and a slight curve at the top of the tailgate as a concession to good looks and aerodynamics. At the back, the near-vertical tailgate is ideal for maximising interior space, while the long roofline and short overhangs also contribute to maximum space efficiency. If that sounds like a recipe for a car you’d rather not spend too long looking at, don’t be fooled - there’s a chunky cuteness to the Citigo - you might even think it’s appealing enough to give it a name...


Simplicity is the order of the day on the inside too, although that doesn’t mean it’s all doom and gloom in here either.. There’s a substantial glazed area to let in lots of light, while the layout of the dashboard helps to boost the feeling of space. 


The major controls are mounted centrally and high up by the driver, with a display screen sat on top depending on the model you choose. The instruments are also clear and attractive, with a handy trip computer in the bottom of the speedometer. It might not feel like you’re swimming in equipment, but what there is feels of good quality, which prevents you feeling like you couldn’t afford a proper car.


Further costs savings are made in the engine department, which is reduced to two simple and almost-identical options. Both engines are 1.0-litre three-cylinder units, with a choice of 60PS and 75PS outputs, with a torque figure of 95Nm for both options. 


There’s not a huge amount to choose between the two - they’re both free-spinning and willing companions, with very similar fuel consumption and emissions performance too. We’d suggest choosing the 75PS version if you can stretch to it, as the little extra performance is useful if you plan on hitting the motorway. Most versions are fitted with a five-speed manual gearbox which is easy to use and has well-chosen ratios to suit city and out of town driving. An automated manual was also available as an option, but a poor driving experience meant it wasn’t particularly popular.


The Citigo may be relatively old now compared to some of the competition, but its strengths remain - it’s easy to live with, easy to drive and very good value.


With your sensible hat on, the Skoda Citigo is the best option compared to the SEAT Mii and Volkswagen Up, because it offers almost all the same attributes but for less cash. It also stands comparison with rivals from other manufacturers too, with strong abilities in almost every area.


If you're looking for the EV version, you need our Skoda Citigo-e iV review.

Is the Skoda Citigo right for you?

It might be classed as a city car, but if you can fit all the people and luggage you need into a Citigo then there’s a good chance it can fit into your life. 


Whether you are a new driver that needs something small and easy to manage, or a small family that takes occasional longer distance trips, the Citigo has the breadth of ability that makes it able to tackle all of those tasks. The fact that it is one of the cheapest cars to tax, fuel and insure is a bonus for everyone. 


Most of its rivals offer similar strong points - low running costs and a compact exterior are essentials for the city car class - but the Citigo manages to do all this while still feeling like a car for grown ups. The quality of the interior and the way it drives make it feel like a bigger car that’s been shrunk to fit, which is definitely a good thing.

What’s the best Citigo model to choose?

With just two engine options to choose from you don’t need to spend hours agonising over which one to go for. The 60PS version is a willing companion, but you can get 75PS models for a fraction more money and have the extra ease of use on the motorway. Avoid the automatic gearbox - it’s a poor example of the breed and makes it much less fun to drive.


The entry-level S trim is pretty light on equipment. You get a CD player with auxiliary input, but no remote locking or electric windows - it’s very much an old-school base model.


SE is a big improvement and the minimum spec you should consider, as it adds air conditioning, ESC, electric windows and remote locking. Above that is the Elegance model, which adds niceties like alloy wheels and heated seats, none of which are essential. If you want the higher-power engine it has to be the Elegance model, otherwise we’d suggest SE as the one to go for.

What other cars are similar to the Skoda Citigo?

It goes without saying (but we’ll say it anyway) that the Citigo’s closest rivals are the Volkswagen Up and SEAT Mii, the former offering a bit more class and the option of a more powerful turbo engine on latter models, while the Mii is arguably a bit better looking but may cost a little more.


Another trio, this time the Peugeot/Citroen/Toyota triplets in the form of the 108, C1 and Aygo offer a similar low-cost but big value take on the city car, although they are not quite as sophisticated to drive or a cabin that’s as nice to be in. A top choice in the city car sector is the Hyundai i10, which isn’t quite as nice to drive but is more spacious inside and is well-built.

Learn more

Skoda Citigo Front Interior

On the inside

Skoda Citigo Rear View

Driving

Skoda Citigo Rim

Cost to run

Skoda Citigo Electric Infotainment

Prices and Specs

Ask the heycar experts: common questions

Is the Skoda Citigo a good car?

Whether you are a new driver that needs something small and easy to manage, or a small family that takes occasional longer distance trips, the Citigo has the breadth of ability that makes it able to tackle all of those tasks. The fact that it is one of the cheapest cars to tax, fuel and insure is a bonus for everyone. 

David Ross

Answered by

David Ross

Is the Skoda Citigo same as Volkswagen Up?

The Citigo has the body structure, mechanicals and basic interior layout as the Volkswagen Up and SEAT Mii, while the exterior is basically the same with some detail changes to distinguish the three. As is typically the way within the Volkswagen Group of brands, the Skoda take on things is to prioritise value, and frequently the Citigo was the cheapest contender of the three when compared model-for-model.

Andy Brady

Answered by

Andy Brady

Does Skoda Citigo have air conditioning?

Go with an SE model as the minimum standard, which adds important things like air conditioning and ESC.

Andy Brady

Answered by

Andy Brady

What engine is in the Skoda Citigo?

The limited choice here means you can’t go very wrong. It’s a 1.0-litre, three-cylinder petrol engine regardless, you just get to choose a 60PS or 75PS output. There’s not much between the two, with identical claimed combined fuel consumption and CO2 emissions whichever version you choose. 

heycar editorial team

Answered by

heycar editorial team

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