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Smart EQ Fortwo Review

Smart Fortwo Coupe
Smart Fortwo Coupe
Smart Fortwo Coupe
Smart Fortwo Coupe
Smart Fortwo Coupe
Smart Fortwo Coupe
Smart Fortwo Coupe
Smart Fortwo Coupe
Smart Fortwo Coupe
Smart Fortwo Coupe
Smart Fortwo Coupe

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Smart Fortwo Coupe

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Smart Fortwo Coupe

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Smart Fortwo Coupe

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Smart Fortwo Coupe

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Smart Fortwo Coupe

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Smart Fortwo Coupe

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Smart Fortwo Coupe

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Smart Fortwo Coupe

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Smart Fortwo Coupe

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1 / 10

  • Launched in 2018
  • City car
  • EV
  • Launch year
    2018
  • Body type
    City car
  • Fuel type
    EV

Interested in buying a Smart Fortwo Coupe?

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heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

00/10
heycar rating
Electric power adds more problems

Best bits

  • A breeze to park and great in the city
  • Good standard specification and quality feel
  • Strong low-speed acceleration

Not so great

  • Very poor range
  • Handling and ride still compromised
  • Two seat arrangement limits effectiveness

Read by

Smart EQ Fortwo Front Side View

Overall verdict

Smart EQ Fortwo Driver's Seat

On the inside

Smart EQ Fortwo Front Side View

Driving

Smart EQ Fortwo Right Side View

How much does it cost to run

Smart EQ Fortwo Front Side View

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"Turning the Fortwo into an electric car was a good idea in principle, maximising its capabilities in the city and playing to its strengths of manoeuvrability and compactness. But the very limited range makes it even less versatile than the petrol-powered version, which was already compromised at higher speeds and in terms of its two-seat arrangement."

Smart EQ Fortwo Front Side View


Smart aimed to reinvent the city car with the introduction of the truly tiny Fortwo, and did so by tearing up the rules and creating a car that could do things no other rival could. The Smart has gone through a second revolution too, with production of petrol-powered versions discontinuing in 2019 and concentrating on pure electric power in the form of the EQ Fortwo.


This generation of the Smart Fortwo was introduced in 2014, and the EQ essentially carries over the same structure, design and mechanicals - bar the powertrain. There’s no change to the dimensions so it is comfortably the shortest electric car (excluding the Renault Twizy) on sale today. At 2695mm long it is almost 1.5 metres shorter than a Ford Fiesta. It’s quite wide and tall given its length, and is a strict two-seater.


The biggest change between the regular Fortwo and the EQ is the electric drivetrain, which means an 82PS electric motor is placed between the rear wheels - just where the petrol engines lived - with a 17.6kWh battery pack under the floor. Also like the petrol models, the EQ Fortwo is available both as a two-door coupe and a convertible - making it one of very few electric cabriolets too.


Familiarity does not lessen the impact of the EQ Fortwo. This is still a shockingly small car from the outside, with tiny overhangs, a bonnet hardly big enough to be worthy of the name and a rear end that’s shorter still. To this you can add a number of colour and trim options, including having a contrast colour for certain body panels. 


Whether you choose the Coupe or Cabriolet, there is just a single door on each side with the luggage space at the rear. On Coupes you get a handy split tailgate where the top window can be opened separately and the lower half drops down like a pick-up. On Cabriolets however you just get the lower section, giving a narrow boot opening.


Step inside and you’re immediately aware of the unusual space. Both driver and passenger sit higher up than in most cars, which increases visibility without compromising comfort. Understandably, with a car small enough that you can almost touch all four corners from the driver’s seat, it’s easy to judge where the car’s extremities are.


The driving experience adds the plus points of electric to those of the regular Fortwo You get whizzy acceleration from low speeds thanks to the generous torque, noise levels are low at lower speeds too and the Fortwo's manoeuvrability comes to the fore in towns and cities. 


On the downside however, the Fortwo’s handling is still a mixed bag. Although the battery pack helps to improve the weight balance, it’s still a car that can feel unsettled on quicker roads while the ride quality is also mixed, with poorly-surfaced roads causing it to fidget and transfer that into the cabin.


The Fortwo’s driving experience is something of a mixed bag. In some respects it is way ahead of everything else; its size allows you to do things you can’t in any other car, with a super-tight turning circle and excellent manoeuvrability. The turbocharged engine is also pretty fizzy, especially the more powerful 90PS version, making it eager in town. 


On the downside, the ultra-short wheelbase and relatively stiff suspension means the ride quality is poor on some surfaces, and although it never feels like it is going to tip over, its height and the amount of body roll during cornering can chip away at the driver’s confidence.


This is one of the cheapest EVs you can buy, and if you stick to the city it is fun and very useful. But heading out of the city exposes its flaws, while the range is poor - most of its rivals are too far ahead on this front.


If you're looking for the standard petrol version, you need our Smart Fortwo review.



Ready to get your top quality Smart Fortwo Coupe?

  • All cars come with a warranty
  • Selected dealers only
  • All quality checked

Smart Fortwo Coupe

60kW EQ Pulse Premium 17kWh 2dr Auto [22kWCh]

  • 2020
  • 275 miles
  • Mercedes-Benz of Beaconsfield
  • Buckinghamshire, HP91QJ
Price:£15,000
PCP: £250.57/mo

Representative example: Contract Length: 36 months, 35 Monthly Payments: £250.57, Customer Deposit: £2,250.00, Total Deposit: £2,250.00, Optional Final Payment: £6,788.00, Total Charge For Credit: £2,807.95, Total Amount Payable: £17,807.95, Representative APR: 9.9%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 9.48%, Excess Mileage Charge: 8ppm, Mileage Per Annum: 10,000

Is the Smart EQ Fortwo right for you?

Even more so than the standard Fortwo, the EQ is a car that only really makes sense in the city. If you have to travel into a busy area that has an emissions-based congestion charge, and you have ready access to parking and charging, the Fortwo EQ can be handy, useable and save you money in the long run.


But if you have to travel longer distances, or carry more than one passenger, the EQ is not equipped to do so. More than anything else, the lack of range puts it behind its key rivals and will make it a niche choice for buyers.

What’s the best Smart EQ Fortwo model to choose?

All versions of the EQ Fortwo have the same battery capacity and electric motor, so there are no choices to be made there. It’s also strictly an automatic only car.


The EQ Fortwo model range kicks off with the Passion Advanced, which actually enjoys a strong specification. You get alloy wheels, rear parking sensors, climate control and a 7-inch touchscreen system with DAB, Bluetooth and Mirror Link, which might well be enough for most people. 


Pulse Premium adds different alloy wheels, a rear view camera and slightly different interior trim, while the Prime Exclusive includes LED headlamps, rain and light sensors and heated leather seats amongst others. Above that is the range-topping Edition One, which adds a ton of Brabus-branded visual upgrades inside and out.


We’d suggest sticking with the Passion Advanced unless you particularly want the top-spec model. You can also add a winter package, which includes additional interior insulation, seat heating if not already fitted, a heated steering wheel and an energy-efficient climate control system with pre-heating function - this is a worthwhile addition if you plan to use the car in cold weather.


What other cars are similar to the Smart EQ Fortwo?

There are few cars that can realistically compare to the Smart EQ Fortwo. The only other two-seater electric car is the Renault Twizy, which is technically a quadricycle and is the only contender that is cheaper too.


More realistic alternatives come from Renault in the shape of the Zoe EV, and the Volkswagen e-Up, Skoda Citigo e iV and SEAT Mii Electric, although all of these cars are bigger and more expensive to buy. All of them do also offer far superior range, which is usually the key factor when making EV buying decisions.

Learn more

Smart EQ Fortwo Driver's Seat

On the inside

Smart EQ Fortwo Front Side View

Driving

Smart EQ Fortwo Right Side View

How much does it cost to run

Smart EQ Fortwo Front Side View

Prices, versions and specification

Interested in buying a Smart Fortwo Coupe?

View Smart Fortwo Coupe cars for sale