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Ssangyong Korando
Ssangyong Korando
Ssangyong Korando
Ssangyong Korando
Ssangyong Korando
Ssangyong Korando
Ssangyong Korando
Ssangyong Korando
Ssangyong Korando
Ssangyong Korando
Ssangyong Korando

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Ssangyong Korando

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Ssangyong Korando

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Ssangyong Korando

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Ssangyong Korando

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Ssangyong Korando

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heycar review

      Launch year
      2019
      Body type
      Crossover
      Fuel type
      Petrol, Diesel
Andy Brady

Written by

Andy Brady

00/10
heycar rating
Ponderous yet affordable Qashqai rival

Best bits

  • Practical choice with spacious rear seats and big boot
  • Generous equipment levels
  • Transferable seven-year warranty

Not so great

  • Not as cheap as you might expect - especially high-spec models
  • Some of the interior finishes are a bit below-par
  • Quite expensive to run in terms of fuel and insurance costs

Read by

SsangYong Korando Front Side View

Overall verdict

SsangYong Korando Gear Stick

On the inside

SsangYong Korando Left Side View

Driving

SsangYong Korando Car Function

How much does it cost to run

SsangYong Korando Rear View

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"The SsangYong Korando is now in its fourth generation - so why has it taken you until now to hear about it?"

SsangYong Korando Front Side View

 It’s a bit of an obscure choice, made by Korean brand SsangYong and sold as a budget alternative to the Nissan Qashqai. It ticks all of the crossover SUV boxes. It’s hugely practical, easy to drive and loaded with standard equipment. A five-star Euro NCAP safety rating (a first for SsangYong) and a seven-year, 150,000-mile transferable warranty should be enough to attract your attention, even if the sharper-than-ever looks don’t quite do it for you.


Two new engines follow the downsizing trend: there’s a 1.5-litre petrol and a 1.6-litre diesel, both available with manual or automatic gearboxes, and the latter with four-wheel drive. It’s a car that’s traditionally been popular with the towing fraternity, and that continues to be the case. The diesel can lug up to 2000kg, which is a pretty hefty caravan. 


While it’s better than ever to drive, it’s still a long way away from being as sharp as a Peugeot 3008. We quite like it though - the (rather light and lifeless) steering takes a lot of turns from lock to lock, and it’ll lurch about a bit in the bends. It’s characterful.


It’s also not as refined as alternatives. There’s quite a lot of engine noise, particularly from the diesel, which grumbles away and makes a particular din if you floor the accelerator to keep up with traffic. This is something you might have to do quite often, as it’s far from swift - most rivals will out-accelerate it from the traffic lights, if that’s your thing.


The diesel feels pokier than the plodding petrol though. Even with a power output of 163PS, the petrol-powered Korando is slower than a 1.0-litre Skoda Karoq with just 115PS. There’s an electric version on its way in 2021, with a real-world range of more than 200 miles - it’ll be a while before these start trickling down to the used market, but it could be worth waiting for.


If you opt for the top-spec Ultimate model, you get a rather extensive list of standard equipment. One of its most impressive features is the 10.25-inch digital instrument cluster, which was only the preserve of expensive Audi models not so long ago. There’s also a slick nine-inch navigation system with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, as well as a really good reversing camera (honestly, it’s more detailed than our television).


There’s a caveat, of course. You can spend more than £32,000 on a new Korando Ultimate, and that’s proper money. But depreciation is your friend, and you should be able to pick up a nearly-new model for considerably less. If you’re not fussed about having all the bells and whistles, lower-spec models start from around £20,000 new. It won’t be long before used examples are available for around half that.


We rate the SsangYong Korando as a no-nonsense crossover SUV with an extensive list of standard equipment and affordable price tag. It’s far from perfect though, with noisy, old-fashioned engines and high running costs. Most buyers will probably be better looking at mainstream alternatives like the Peugeot 3008 or Kia Sportage.


Is the SsangYong Korando right for you?

If you want a no-nonsense SUV and don’t particularly care about badge appeal, the SsangYong Korando could be an excellent choice. It’s very practical and high-spec models come loaded with standard equipment - but don’t take it for granted that it’ll be cheaper than the competition.


The fact SsangYong’s backing it with an extensive seven-year warranty, which is transferable to second (and third, and fourth…) owners should ease your mind about buying from a manufacturer you may previously have never heard of. The five-star Euro NCAP safety rating is a green flag for family buyers too.


What’s the best SsangYong Korando model/engine to choose?

The choice of engine ought to come down to what you’ll use the Korando for. As is usually the case, petrols are better for low mileages and urban use. The diesels are better suited to high-mileages, longer journeys and utilitarian use, such as towing or venturing off-road. That said, the diesel does suit the Korando better, with a useful amount of torque and better fuel economy.

In terms of trim level, we reckon the Pioneer hits the sweet spot in terms of value for money. It’s a bit of an oddity in terms of specification - it’s aimed at caravanners, coming with a full-size spare wheel (that’s a good thing), smaller 17-inch alloy wheels (a great thing for ride comfort), yet no 10.25-inch digital instrument cluster (a ‘nice to have’ but not essential). Go for the top-spec Ultimate if you want everything and can get a good deal on the used market.

What other cars are similar to the SsangYong Korando?

The SsangYong Korando has traditionally undercut conventional rivals although the latest model has moved towards the mainstream with a fancier cabin and stronger prices. As such, you could also consider alternatives like the Peugeot 3008 (which has a superb, futuristic cabin and is good to drive) or Skoda Karoq (which is a very sensible and practical choice).


There’s also the SEAT Ateca (which is similar to the Karoq but slightly more entertaining to drive), or the age-old Nissan Qashqai (which everyone loves but actually isn’t as good as its more up-to-date rivals). The Kia Sportage is showing its age a bit now but has better engines than the Korando, and also comes with a seven-year warranty.


Learn more

SsangYong Korando Gear Stick

On the inside

SsangYong Korando Left Side View

Driving

SsangYong Korando Car Function

How much does it cost to run

SsangYong Korando Rear View

Prices, versions and specification