Favourites
Subaru Levorg Review logo

Subaru Levorg Review

Subaru Levorg
Subaru Levorg
Subaru Levorg
Subaru Levorg
Subaru Levorg
Subaru Levorg
Subaru Levorg
Subaru Levorg
Subaru Levorg
Subaru Levorg
Subaru Levorg

1/10

Subaru Levorg

2/10

Subaru Levorg

3/10

Subaru Levorg

4/10

Subaru Levorg

5/10

Subaru Levorg

6/10

Subaru Levorg

7/10

Subaru Levorg

8/10

Subaru Levorg

9/10

Subaru Levorg

10/10

1 / 10

heycar review

      Launch year
      2015
      Body type
      Estate
      Fuel type
      Petrol
heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

00/10
heycar rating
Niche estate Subaru worth avoiding

Best bits

  • It’s different
  • Comprehensive standard passive and active safety equipment 
  • Did we mention it’s different?

Not so great

  • Different is admirable, downright weird and compromised as a result is less so
  • Performance, economy and emissions are all seriously lacklustre for the class
  • It’s significantly bettered by every rival, and even its cheaper Subaru Outback relation

Read by

Subaru Levorg Front Side View

Overall verdict

Subaru Levorg Front Interior

On the inside

Subaru Levorg Front Side View

Driving

Subaru Levorg Side Rear View

How much does it cost to run

Subaru Levorg Right Side View

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"The Levorg’s sole redeeming feature is Subaru’s admirable commitment to active and passive safety, the oddball estate coming with a huge suite of standard safety equipment – the likes of which you’ll likely pay handsomely to option on its ‘rivals’. Without that, it’d be impossible to recommend, and even with it, it’s very difficult to do so. The Levorg didn’t impress a great deal when it was launched in 2015, and Subaru’s changes in 2019 have actually made it worse. We’d avoid it and buy a Subaru Outback, or anything else, instead."

Subaru Levorg Front Side View

 Subaru reckons its brand values are centred around robustness, practicality and fun to drive characteristics, but only two of those are apparent with its Levorg estate car.


Always a niche manufacturer, in the UK at least, the Levorg is only offered as a single, well-specified model, with a sole 2.0-litre naturally aspirated petrol engine driving through Subaru’s much vaunted permanent symmetrical all-wheel drive.


The Levorg replaced the Legacy Sport Tourer in the UK back in 2015, Subaru actually referencing that car’s predecessor when launching the Levorg, saying its customers preferred its more compact dimensions, but still wanted useful practicality. That explains the Levorg’s relative compactness, which despite some clever engineering does impact on its capaciousness – its boot space bettered by many rivals.


When it first arrived back in 2015 it was powered by a 1.6-litre turbocharged flat-four boxer engine, but Subaru made some revisions to the Levorg in 2019, with a slightly re-profiled bumper, more comprehensive equipment levels and some new alloy wheels. 


Inexplicably, while doing so, it also removed the 170PS 1.6-litre turbocharged petrol engine and replaced it with a 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine, which does without a turbocharger and produces less power. Subaru, somewhat desperately, quotes 149.5PS, that half evidently important, for the 2.0-litre engine. 


More significantly, torque output also down by a hefty 52Nm over that 1.6-litre turbo’s 250Nm. Subaru here seems to have wilfully bucked the current industry convention of ‘downsizing’ by adding smaller capacity, more efficient, and powerful turbocharged engines 


While not everybody wants to drive their Subaru like a Colin McRae and Richard Burns rallying era gold wheeled, turbocharged Impreza, but a modicum of performance would be useful.


 Indeed, while the original 1.6-litre turbocharged wasn’t particularly brisk before, at least had some low rev torque, the 2.0-litre having less, and what little it has is higher up the rev range. It feels even more slovenly as a result. 


The poor performance is exacerbated by the standard fitment of a CVT (Continuously Variable Transmission) automatic gearbox, CVT transmissions impacting negatively on not just the driving experience and performance, but also economy, while they’re not much cop when it comes to refinement, either. 


Subaru has always been about niche appeal, but we struggle to see quite who’d want that particular, and peculiar mix of engine and transmission, in a modestly sized estate car from a brand that’s little recognised outside rural enclaves and those who enjoyed rallying’s heyday. 


Particularly at the circa £35,000 price point it operates in. It might make more sense if it were turbocharged as is in its Japanese home market, though even then it’d be a tricky car to recommend over newer, more spacious and far more fuel efficient rivals. If Subaru has one ace up its sleeve it’s safety, the Levorg’s standard kit list being extensive, in both passive and active safety aids, but it’s not so far ahead of rivals here to recommend it.


It’s wilfully, actually painfully, distinct from the mainstream norm. Subaru’s pragmatic stance on safety and being wedded to Subaru’s core engineering attributes of flat-four engines and four-wheel drive, as well as its CVT gearbox, does limit its appeal significantly, to the point we’re genuinely at a loss to understand why Subaru bothers to put any on a boat to bring them to the UK, except, perhaps, to use as an anchor. 

Ready to get your top quality Subaru Levorg?

  • All cars come with a warranty
  • Selected dealers only
  • All quality checked

Subaru Levorg

1.6 GT 5dr Lineartronic

  • 2017
  • 41,000 miles
  • Proven Subaru Haslemere
  • Surrey, GU272AP
Price:£14,000
HP: £373.92/mo

Representative example: Contract Length: 36 months, 36 Monthly Payments: £373.92, Customer Deposit: £2,100.00, Total Deposit: £2,100.00, Total Charge For Credit: £1,561.12, Total Amount Payable: £15,561.12, Representative APR: 8.5%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 8.19%

Is the Subaru Levorg right for you?

If you’ve gotten this far, then there’s a slim possibility it is, but we’d seriously recommend you look elsewhere, even within Subaru’s own range, if, as is likely, you really don’t want to offend the Subaru dealer who you’re on first name terms with and have always bought your cars from. 


You could have a bigger Subaru Outback with its more rugged crossover looks, larger boot, four-wheel drive and much the same equipment levels, for less than the Levorg. 


We’d call that an absolute no-brainer, particularly as the Outback comes with a larger 2.5-litre engine which produces more power and is actually more efficient. If you’re absolutely determined to be different, perhaps being the sort of person who might run a marathon in a stiletto heels carrying a fully-loaded brick hod, then, yes, consider a Levorg, but even then, only if it comes with a massive discount.

What’s the best Subaru Levorg model/engine to choose?

For best, read only, the sole Levorg option being that 2.0-litre CVT gearbox, four-wheel drive estate car. The best Levorg, then, is the only one you can have, and even then, taking the Subaru’s own sales pitch on the Levorg - practicality, all-wheel drive stability and capability - then it’s bettered by Subaru’s own (cheaper) Outback model. 


Significantly bettered, too. Indeed, it might be considered unusual for us to say so, but, in the best interests of our readers and good consumer advice, the reckon best Levorg you can buy isn’t in fact a Levorg, but is Subaru’s own Outback. 


That the Outback does everything the Levorg does and more, and for less money. Cross the showroom then, and buy it instead, you’ll thank us for it, and you won’t ruin your long-standing friendship with your Subaru dealer.

What other cars are similar to the Subaru Levorg?

Ignoring that Outback across the Subaru showroom for a minute, the Levorg’s price means it can count among its rivals cars like the Volkswagen Passat, Audi A4 Avant (or Audi A4 Allroad), xDrive versions of BMW 3 Series Touring models, Skoda’s massive Superb Estate in 4x4 form, as well as any number of other mainstream and premium estate cars with, or without, four-wheel drive. 


Muddying the buying road further is a huge choice of SUV and crossover models with greater four-wheel drive capability than the Levorg. All are similar, and, in reality, much better. However, if you want an estate with a 2.0-litre boxer engine, CVT and four-wheel drive we can’t think of another car that’s identical in specification, evidently, for good reason.

Learn more

Subaru Levorg Front Interior

On the inside

Subaru Levorg Front Side View

Driving

Subaru Levorg Side Rear View

How much does it cost to run

Subaru Levorg Right Side View

Prices, versions and specification