Favourites
Suzuki Celerio Review logo

Suzuki Celerio Review

Suzuki Celerio
Suzuki Celerio
Suzuki Celerio
Suzuki Celerio
Suzuki Celerio
Suzuki Celerio
Suzuki Celerio
Suzuki Celerio
Suzuki Celerio
Suzuki Celerio
Suzuki Celerio

1/10

Suzuki Celerio

2/10

Suzuki Celerio

3/10

Suzuki Celerio

4/10

Suzuki Celerio

5/10

Suzuki Celerio

6/10

Suzuki Celerio

7/10

Suzuki Celerio

8/10

Suzuki Celerio

9/10

Suzuki Celerio

10/10

1 / 10

heycar review

      Launch year
      2015
      Body type
      City car
      Fuel type
      Petrol
heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

00/10
heycar rating
Bargain basement and feels it

Best bits

  • Excellent standard specification
  • Easy driving experience
  • Impressive economy

Not so great

  • Out of its depth at higher speeds
  • Cheap-feeling interior
  • Average Euro NCAP score

Read by

Suzuki Celerio Front Side View

Overall verdict

Suzuki Celerio Front Interior

On the inside

Suzuki Celerio Rear View

Driving

Suzuki Celerio Bootspace

How much does it cost to run

Suzuki Celerio Rear Side View

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"The Celerio takes something of an old-school approach to city car motoring, keeping the sticker price low by some fairly obvious corner-cutting on the sophistication of the design. But it is 100 per cent honest in doing so, and the result is a car that is cheap to buy and run, and is loaded with kit. For some buyers that is all that is required."

Suzuki Celerio Front Side View

Suzuki is a textbook example of a brand that has enjoyed mixed success. Never a manufacturer that has attempted to crack big volume models, the cars in its range have always been relatively niche products, but in doing so it has frequently snared a loyal band of customers .



The Celerio is another example of this, taking on the city car segment with a blend of old-fashioned good value alongside a hefty dose of standard equipment.


If you’re not well-versed on your world car family tree, the Celerio was actually manufactured in Pakistan and also sold in that country as a Pak Suzuki, in India as a Maruti and also in Thailand under the Suzuki flag. Building and selling a small car across world markets makes a lot of sense, because it helps to keep prices low which can then be passed on to the customer. What it does mean though is that it is not necessarily built and designed to cater for snooty European buyers.


A quick look at the Celerio from the outside is pretty revealing, as the basic shape of the Celerio is not massively different from its predecessors. With relatively small wheels and a simple two-box shape (one box for the cabin and a second box for the engine) this is as simple as car design gets, but that also is indicative of the Celerio’s philosophy - the more simple it is, the less it costs.


Step inside the Celerio and there’s a mixture of good and not-so-good news. The design of the cabin is not the prehistoric relic you may have expected; there’s no bare metal on show, the instruments are clear and easy to read, and the centre console has a decent stereo and climate controls exactly where you’d hope to find them. Look a little closer and the penny-pinching is more obvious. There’s very little in the way of quality materials; almost all the plastics are hard to the touch, albeit hard-wearing, and while the standard specification is excellent, you’re never likely to forget this is a car built down to a price every step of the way.


Mechanically the Celerio also plays a very straight bat, but with low running costs a major priority, there are significant savings to be had. There are two engine options, both 1.0-litre in capacity, with three-cylinders and 68PS, with the basic engine offering 90Nm of torque. The higher-specification engine is called Dualjet, so-called because it has twin injectors per cylinder which boosts efficiency; as well as offering a little more torque with 93Nm, it has a significant effect on fuel consumption. Under the old NEDC measurement, the standard 1.0-litre claims 65.7mpg combined, while the Dualjet increases this to 72.4mpg combined.


On paper the Celerio has a good deal going for it, but the actual driving experience is more patchy. The engines are efficient, but the lack of sound deadening means they are both quite vocal, and noise levels increase rapidly with an increase in speed making motorway journeys a wearing experience. All the major controls are light and easy to operate which makes it well suited to town work, and the Celerio’s light weight means it does a decent job of gliding over bumps and hanging on in the corners. It’s unrefined, but it can do the job.


There’s no questioning the Celerio’s budget approach to motoring, it’s just whether or not it matches up with what you expect from a city car. For the budget-conscious it’s hard to beat, but it requires a degree of tolerance if you plan to venture out of the city.

Is the Celerio right for you?

If you are almost entirely city-bound, want to spend as little as possible but still want the maximum amount of kit from your small car, the Celerio should be near the top of your shopping list. However, many buyers want a bit more sophistication from their small cars, and are willing to pay for it - the Celerio’s old-school approach is definitely not for everyone.

What’s the best Celerio to choose?

You can’t go too far wrong in choosing your Celerio, because there are only two engine options and two trim levels. On the engine front, the Dualjet motor is a no-brainer; it was the more popular option on new cars, will cost little more to buy but offers superior fuel consumption however you drive it.


Even less thought is required when it comes to choosing what trim to buy. SZ3 models are pretty stacked with kit; you get remote locking, electric front windows, air conditioning, USB input to the DAB radio, Bluetooth and alloy wheels. The SZ4 adds an extra pair of speakers, electrically adjustable door mirrors and electric rear windows - all of those things are a bonus, but it’s hardly the end of the world to live without them. But given there’s so little between the possible engine and trim combos it makes sense to buy the best example you can afford.

What other cars are similar to the Suzuki Celerio?

There’s never a shortage of city cars to choose from, but even within that narrow definition there is quite a lot of diversity. Cars like the Toyota Aygo, Peugeot 108 and Citroen C1 triplets are big on value but deliver this by sharing design and development costs, so you get a well-built car with a good specification. 


The Volkswagen Up, SEAT Mii and Skoda Citigo take a similar approach; they may be older designs but they have a quality finish and are good to drive. If budget is everything you could consider the Dacia Sandero, which is still the cheapest new car money can buy.


Learn more

Suzuki Celerio Front Interior

On the inside

Suzuki Celerio Rear View

Driving

Suzuki Celerio Bootspace

How much does it cost to run

Suzuki Celerio Rear Side View

Prices, versions and specification

You’ve picked a favourite! Now keep up to date with the latest updates, offers and news.

By submitting, you agree to our privacy policy.