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Vauxhall Cascada Review

Vauxhall Cascada
Vauxhall Cascada
Vauxhall Cascada
Vauxhall Cascada
Vauxhall Cascada
Vauxhall Cascada
Vauxhall Cascada
Vauxhall Cascada
Vauxhall Cascada
Vauxhall Cascada
Vauxhall Cascada

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Vauxhall Cascada

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Vauxhall Cascada

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Vauxhall Cascada

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Vauxhall Cascada

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Vauxhall Cascada

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Vauxhall Cascada

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Vauxhall Cascada

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Vauxhall Cascada

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Vauxhall Cascada

10/10

1 / 10

heycar review

      Launch year
      2013
      Body type
      Convertible
      Fuel type
      Petrol, Diesel
00/10
heycar rating
Admirably competent convertible, undesirable badge

Best bits

  • Good looks
  • Lots of practicality for a drop-top 
  • Should be cheap to buy and run used

Not so great

  • It’s a Vauxhall...
  • Interior lacking in style
  • Smallest engine feels a bit overwhelmed 

Read by

Vauxhall Cascada Front Side View

Overall verdict

Vauxhall Cascada Front Interior

On the inside

Vauxhall Cascada Rear View

Driving

Vauxhall Cascada Left Side View

How much does it cost to run

Vauxhall Cascada Overhead View

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"The Vauxhall Cascada is fairly unremarkable to drive, but good looks, low running costs and decent equipment make it about as sensible a non-sensible purchase as you could go for. You’ll stand out from the premium cabriolet crowd, too, because the Cascada’s quite a rare thing."

Vauxhall Cascada Front Side View

Introduced in 2013, and quietly bowing out in 2019, the Vauxhall Cascada demonstrates what a fickle marketplace the convertible one is. A smart-looking, fine-driving drop-top, with space to rival the segment above the price bracket it was sold in, the Cascada never sold particularly well against the premium rivals it hoped to steal sales from.


Admittedly, that was always an ambitious goal for Vauxhall, but the Cascada wasn’t a bad car at all, indeed, it was rather a good one but one evidently wearing the wrong badge. 


Where you bought it dictated what badge it wore on its grille. The Cascada was sold globally under GM’s other brands, it being the Opel Cascada in Europe, Buick Cascada in the US and Holden Cascada in Australia. Regardless of where it was sold it was never a huge success, those mainstream badges just not cutting it against upmarket rivals, even if, on paper, the Cascada potentially offered buyers more for their money. 


That’s particularly true in relation to space, the Cascada was as long as cars like the Audi A5 convertible, but was priced more in the sphere of cars like the Golf Convertible. That Volkswagen, with its more desirable mainstream badge, has abandoned that Golf Convertible – instead offering a drop-top based on the T-Roc SUV, does somewhat underline how difficult the convertible market is. It’s hardly surprising, then, that Vauxhall does not having any plans to replace the Cascada.


It’ll be a used purchase then, and the virtues that made it a decent buy, badge aside, when available box-fresh from dealers, are arguably elevated as a pre-owned purchase. Good value, surprising practicality and a comfortable, unfussy drive, the Cascada should be cheaper to buy and run than its premium competitors, and rarer, too, which will help it turn heads – which, after all, is arguably the point with cars like these.  

Ready to get your top quality Vauxhall Cascada?

  • All cars come with a warranty
  • Selected dealers only
  • All quality checked

Vauxhall Cascada

1.4T Elite 2dr

  • 2016
  • 59,192 miles
  • Perrys Vauxhall Bury
  • Lancashire, BL81AL
Price:£8,990
HP: £254.29/mo

Representative example: Contract Length: 36 months, 35 Monthly Payments: £254.29, Customer Deposit: £1,348.00, Total Deposit: £1,348.50, Total Charge For Credit: £1,522.94, Total Amount Payable: £10,512.94, Representative APR: 12.9%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 6.6%

Is the Vauxhall Cascada right for you?

You might have admired it new, but you’ll no longer be able to get one, which leaves you searching through the classifieds instead. As a used buy the Cascada makes a great deal of sense, the badge that limited its appeal when new suppresses its prices used. So, for a canny buyer looking for a classy, inexpensive-to-buy and run drop-top, that’s surprisingly practical too, then the Cascada is worth seeking out.

What’s the best Vauxhall Cascada model/engine to choose

The buying decisions change between new and used arenas, because things like BIK or VED payments aren’t quite so front-of-house in your choices. That makes the your selection less pragmatic, and more on what you want. 


We’d want an Elite specified one, and as it’s a cruiser rather than something you’re going to thrash down a favourite road, the 170PS version, which comes exclusively with an automatic transmission, would suit. If you’re after the best fuel economy though, that’s not the one to have, with the same power 2.0-litre turbodiesel offering the best mpg out of all Cascadas, so if you’re likely to be putting big miles on it, then that’s the one we’d have.

What other cars are similar to the Vauxhall Cascada?

Time was you could have walked into any car showroom and there would have been a cabriolet version available of something mainstream, be it a Ford Focus, Volkswagen Golf, Renault Megane or a whole host of others alternatives. The premium marques ate away at those though, as has a sizeable shift in the market to SUVs, leaving convertibles from mainstream companies a rare thing indeed. 


The Cascada did rival cars like the Audi A3 Cabriolet, as well as the Volkswagen Beetle Cabriolet or MINI Convertible, too. Bigger inside than all of these, it’s also the most practical, so if you’ve got kids and want at least a semblance of comfort for them in the back with the roof down, the Cascada is pretty much in a class of one, without going down the premium route. 

Learn more

Vauxhall Cascada Front Interior

On the inside

Vauxhall Cascada Rear View

Driving

Vauxhall Cascada Left Side View

How much does it cost to run

Vauxhall Cascada Overhead View

Prices, versions and specification