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Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Review

Volkswagen Golf Alltrack
Volkswagen Golf Alltrack
Volkswagen Golf Alltrack
Volkswagen Golf Alltrack
Volkswagen Golf Alltrack
Volkswagen Golf Alltrack
Volkswagen Golf Alltrack
Volkswagen Golf Alltrack
Volkswagen Golf Alltrack
Volkswagen Golf Alltrack
Volkswagen Golf Alltrack

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Volkswagen Golf Alltrack

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Volkswagen Golf Alltrack

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Volkswagen Golf Alltrack

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Volkswagen Golf Alltrack

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Volkswagen Golf Alltrack

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Volkswagen Golf Alltrack

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Volkswagen Golf Alltrack

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Volkswagen Golf Alltrack

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Volkswagen Golf Alltrack

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1 / 10

heycar review

      Launch year
      2015
      Body type
      Estate
      Fuel type
      Diesel
heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

00/10
heycar rating
Smart and practical SUV-alternative

Best bits

  • Practicality and load space
  • Agile dynamics and economy
  • Surprising off-road tenacity

Not so great

  • Rare on the used car market
  • Prices still high
  • Some will prefer the full SUV experience

Read by

Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Front Side View

Overall verdict

Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Front Interior

On the inside

Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Rear Side View

Driving

Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Rear View

How much does it cost to run

Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Right Side View

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict on the Volkswagen Golf Alltrack

"The Alltrack is a niche model within the Golf line-up, but a usefully practical one. For those who need its combination of practicality and year-round, go-anywhere traction, it’s an interesting choice – particularly on the used market, where the hefty up-front costs when new are eased."

Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Front Side View

The Volkswagen Golf Alltrack is the ‘Audi Allroad’ version of the Golf Estate. It has a tough bodykit, raised ride height and standard 4Motion all-wheel drive for enhanced traction and abilities across, well, all sorts of tracks. Those who need the carrying capacity of an estate car combined with the tenacity of an SUV, this niche model is for you. It looks pretty cool, too.


The Alltrack is based on the 2015 version of the Volkswagen Golf Estate, so has now been phased out of the firm’s new car range. But as it’s been on sale since 2015, this means there’s a decent amount of choice on the used car market – and prices start from around half what you’d pay for a factory-fresh model.


It’s a simple and straightforward model line-up, all based around TDI turbodiesel engines. The entry-level version is a 1.6-litre TDI, producing 110PS. Then there’s a 2.0-litre TDI with 150PS, and a higher-powered 184PS version fitted with a seven-speed DSG automatic gearbox (the other two use a six-speed manual). Volkswagen offered turbo petrol versions in some markets, but there are less suited to typical Alltrack buyers: higher-mileage drivers who need go-anywhere confidence.


There’s no missing the Alltrack out on the road, because it looks significantly chunkier and more robust than a plain old Golf Estate. The raised ride height gives it a rugged stance and we like the chunky black plastic wheelarch extensions, which will help shrug off car parking scrapes. The silver finishing strips are upmarket, plus it gets Golf R-style polished door mirror caps and a set of aluminium roof rails.


It’s rather more conventional inside. This is a bit disappointing, given the upmarket finish outside, but then, it’s still a Golf, so it’s a cut above most rivals. The Alcantara-trimmed seats are nice, and you also get a subtly raised-up driving position compared to a normal Golf. As it sits higher off the ground, it’s a bit easier to step in and out of, too.


Rear seat space is as fine as a conventional Golf, while the real clincher is the massive boot. Even with the seats up, it stretches to 605 litres, vastly bigger than a Golf hatchback, and rather larger than a similar-sized SUV, too. The space is also wide, square and very practical – and folding the rear seats extends it to a huge 1,620 litres. This is why people are drawn to the Golf Alltrack: its massive load capacity coupled with its guaranteed all-weather traction. It’s an enormously useful car.


It’s a rather well equipped one, too. Volkswagen pitched it upmarket when new, and you’ll spend more than £30,000 to secure one of the last showroom-fresh versions. This is why used examples are alluring: they cost much less, yet still feel contemporary and classy. Models from 2017, which benefited from the ‘Golf 7.5’ facelift, are particularly worth tracking down. Let’s take you through everything you need to know about the Volkswagen Golf Alltrack.

Is the Volkswagen Golf Alltrack right for you?

Those who need to guarantee being able to get where they’re going, no matter what the weather, road conditions or other obstacles, will err towards an SUV. But those who need to carry large loads may find the lack of estate car practicality a hindrance. For such people, the Volkswagen Golf Alltrack ticks many boxes.


It’s the yawning great boot at the rear that makes it, particularly the way it extends so enormously when the seats are folded. It even has a maximum load capacity of over 600kg, so can lug heavy-duty loads to the top of a mountain.


All the usual Golf luxuries are present and correct. It feels upmarket, refined and comfortable, and is easy to drive and good on fuel. It’s also likely to shrug off whatever heavy-duty use you inflict upon it, thanks to Volkswagen’s tough build quality.

What’s the best Volkswagen Golf Alltrack model/engine to choose?

It’s easy to run through the range of Volkswagen Golf Alltrack variants, as there are only three of them. They’re all called Alltrack, with just one level of specification offering plenty of extras as standard. The Alltrack is positioned at the upper end of the Golf range – consider it the off-road alternative to something like a Golf R hot hatch.


The 1.6-litre TDI is the most fuel-efficient engine, while the 2.0-litre TDI 150 will be the best all-rounder, particularly if you’re planning to make full use of the enormous load capacity. The easiest to drive will be the 2.0-litre TDI 184 with the seven-speed DSG automatic gearbox.


Unlike with some SUVs, you don’t have to worry about accidentally picking one without all-wheel drive as standard. The 4Motion system is fitted to every version of Golf Alltrack sold in the UK.

What other cars are similar to the Volkswagen Golf Alltrack?

The Volkswagen Golf Alltrack was a bit of a trend-setter. When new, it didn’t have many rivals, but now it seems to be inspiring some brands to follow suit. Perhaps the most obvious alternatives are its two Volkswagen Group sister cars: the Seat Leon X-Perience and Skoda Octavia Scout.


The Subaru Forester is a larger rival (the Subaru Levorg is smaller, but petrol only), while Ford has been developing its Active range of Focus variants – although they’re rather more of a styling exercise than the all-weather Alltrack. 


Finally, why not check out the posher Audi alternative, the Audi A4 Allroad? You’ll have to accept either a higher price or an older vehicle, but then you’ll get the four Audi rings on your driveway, along with similar tenacity to the Golf when the weather turns. Similarly, you can go for the Volvo V60 Cross Country.

Learn more

Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Front Interior

On the inside

Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Rear Side View

Driving

Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Rear View

How much does it cost to run

Volkswagen Golf Alltrack Right Side View

Prices, versions and specification