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Volvo V60 Review

Volvo V60
Volvo V60
Volvo V60
Volvo V60
Volvo V60
Volvo V60
Volvo V60
Volvo V60
Volvo V60
Volvo V60
Volvo V60

1/10

Volvo V60

2/10

Volvo V60

3/10

Volvo V60

4/10

Volvo V60

5/10

Volvo V60

6/10

Volvo V60

7/10

Volvo V60

8/10

Volvo V60

9/10

Volvo V60

10/10

1 / 10

heycar review

      Launch year
      2018
      Body type
      Estate
      Fuel type
      Petrol, Diesel, PHEV
heycar editorial team

Written by

heycar editorial team

00/10
heycar rating
Accomplished, attractive, but quite expensive

Best bits

  • Attractive design inside and out
  • High level of comfort
  • Excellent practicality

Not so great

  • Expensive hybrid models
  • Touchscreen may be too much for some
  • Firm ride on some models

Read by

Volvo V60 Front Side View

Overall verdict

Volvo V60 Front Interior

On the inside

Volvo V60 Front Side View

Driving

Volvo V60 Gear Stick

How much does it cost to run

Volvo V60 Bootspace

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

"The V60 has a tough job facing off to the big German opposition but it matches or beats them in most of the key areas as well as bringing distinctive Swedish design into the mix. It’s a car that fulfills in all the practical ways but will appeal to your heart too."

Volvo V60 Front Side View

It’s been 27 years since Volvo stopped making the 240 estate (you know, that Volvo estate) but you wouldn’t know it. Some people still associate the word estate purely with Volvos. The thing is, Volvo has been producing some pretty terrific estate cars ever since, never mind the hatches  and saloons they’re spun off. So when Volvo wheels out a new estate, it’s time to sit up and take notice, because it has the potential and the breeding to be the best in the class.


Walk up to the V60 for the first time and you’d know it was a Volvo even if it was on fire. The brand may have left behind the right-angled designs of the 1980s, but the most recent generation of designs have retained a squared-jawed purpose that only Volvo could pull off. 


The V60 in particular looks very much like a scaled-down V90, which in itself is no bad thing. It’s a clean, unfussy design but smart with it, and there is something inherently Swedish about it, even if that it is just not another German premium estate.


Step inside the V60 and you’re met with Volvo’s interpretation of a 21st Century cabin, which is about as minimalist as it gets. Like the XC90 and the V90, the V60’s interior is dominated by the 9-inch portrait touchscreen sitting centrally on the dashboard. 


It takes care of so many of the vehicle’s functions that the number of buttons elsewhere is very limited - just a small row of buttons and a single knob beneath the screen. It’s a similar story with the instrument display, which is also a 12.3-inch screen but has a more minimalist layout than similar digital cockpits from Audi and BMW.


In terms of physical space the V60 delivers on its reputation. Space for passengers in the front and the rear seats is excellent, while the boot is also one of the largest in the class. Because this is a Volvo there are plenty of practical touches too, like an option pack that adds a divider for the luggage area and a 12v power socket.


Volvo is continuing to push forward the increased electrification of its vehicle range, and as a result the V60 is available with four petrol and one diesel engine options, as well as two petrol-electric plug-in hybrids. Unlike most other hybrids, the V60 versions are the performance vehicles in the range, with 340PS and 405PS for the Polestar model. But because they are plug-in hybrids they still offer the potential for strong economy, even if they are expensive to buy in the first place. There is also the Volvo V60 Cross Country.


The driving experience in the V60 is deeply impressive. Not only does it do a fine job of keeping the poor state of the roads a secret, it’s also a rewarding car to drive at speed. The quality of the suspension makes this feat possible, and although it might not ultimately be the most fun to drive car in the class, that it can be close enough and still be very comfortable is highly appealing.


If you're looking for the older version, you need our Volvo V60 (2010-2018) review.


Ready to get your top quality Volvo V60?

  • All cars come with a warranty
  • Selected dealers only
  • All quality checked

Volvo V60

2.0 D3 [150] Momentum Plus 5dr Auto

  • 2020
  • 4,653 miles
  • Lookers Volvo Colchester
  • Essex, CO11XX
Price:£23,899
PCP: £351.22/mo

Representative example: Contract Length: 37 months, 36 Monthly Payments: £351.22, Customer Deposit: £3,584.00, Total Deposit: £3,584.85, Optional Final Payment: £10,917.29, Total Charge For Credit: £3,247.06, Total Amount Payable: £27,146.06, Representative APR: 6.9%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 3.55%, Excess Mileage Charge: 14.9ppm, Mileage Per Annum: 10,000

Is the Volvo V60 right for you?

There’s no escaping the fact that the V60 is not a cheap car to buy, even if you go for a secondhand model, but almost regardless of which version you choose it offers a lot of car for the money. It’s close to a perfect family wagon, being very comfortable and spacious but also with a well-built cabin that should stand up to anything your little horrors can throw at it. It’s also a prime candidate as a business vehicle, with the potential for low benefit-in-kind rates and comfort on long-distance journeys.


If you need the most amount of space for the least amount of money then there are better options - the Skoda Octavia has more boot space and a smaller price tag - while BMW’s 3 Series remains the best car in the class in terms of the driving experience.


If you need a more rugged version, there's the Volvo V60 Cross Country.


What’s the best Volvo V60 model/engine to choose?

With such an unusual engine mix - four petrols, one diesel and two hybrids - it’s not a straightforward choice. Of the more sensible petrols, the 163PS, 197PS and 250PS all have the same claimed fuel consumption figure so there would not appear to be any penalty in choosing the most powerful version. 


However it is more expensive, the 197PS version is quick enough for most. The D4 diesel is a sound choice if you want increased range and better fuel consumption too. The hybrid models are deeply impressive machines but are very expensive to buy - the top Polestar model is more than £50,000 - so they are great if you can afford them but are hard to justify as a rational purchase.


As for trim levels, there’s no shame in sticking with the entry-level Momentum model which has plenty of kit as standard, while the R-Design model also represents good value. 

What other cars are similar to the Volvo V60?

The V60 is pitched directly against the German premium competition. The BMW 3 Series Touring is generally the most popular compact premium estate, also offering a broad engine, trim and specification range. It’s also considered to be the driver’s choice in this segment, although it is still capable of being comfortable and refined in the right specification.


The Audi A4 Avant is another key German competitor, and is probably one of the best all-rounders in the compact premium estate segment, while the Mercedes-Benz C-Class Estate isn’t quite the best in the class but still holds strong appeal for premium buyers.


Learn more

Volvo V60 Front Interior

On the inside

Volvo V60 Front Side View

Driving

Volvo V60 Gear Stick

How much does it cost to run

Volvo V60 Bootspace

Prices, versions and specification