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Volvo V90 Review

Volvo V90
Volvo V90
Volvo V90
Volvo V90
Volvo V90
Volvo V90
Volvo V90
Volvo V90
Volvo V90
Volvo V90
Volvo V90

1/10

Volvo V90

2/10

Volvo V90

3/10

Volvo V90

4/10

Volvo V90

5/10

Volvo V90

6/10

Volvo V90

7/10

Volvo V90

8/10

Volvo V90

9/10

Volvo V90

10/10

1 / 10

heycar review

      Launch year
      2016
      Body type
      Estate
      Fuel type
      Petrol, Diesel, PHEV
00/10
heycar rating
Large and glorious Volvo wagon

Best bits

  • Clean, modern design
  • Attractive, spacious cabin
  • Clever hybrid tech

Not so great

  • Not an exciting drive
  • Expensive top models
  • Bigger wheels hurt ride quality

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Volvo V90 Front View

Overall verdict

Volvo V90 Front Interior

On the inside

Volvo V90 Rear View

Driving

Volvo V90 Right Side View

How much does it cost to run

Volvo V90 Front View

Prices, versions and specification

Overall verdict

The Volvo V90 offers you Swedish minimalist design that's a stark contrast to the in-your-face brashness found in its most obvious German competitors. It's exterior is a pleasure to look at while the interior is such a nice place to be, you'll simply never want to leave. Its these subject strengths that, if they strike a chord with you, might make it easier to overlook the fact that the V90 isn't objectively as good as the likes of pricier alternatives such as the Mercedes E-Class Estate and BMW 5 Series Touring.

Volvo V90 Front View

The V90 was updated in 2020 getting minor exterior revisions and specification changes, the most notable update was the introduction of Volvo's new 48V mild hybrid engines named the B4, B5 (across diesel and petrol models) and B6 (petrol only).


The exterior tweaks come in the form of new rear light clusters with customary scrolling indicators, plus you can choose from new colours and alloy wheels. None of which diminish from the fact that the V90 is an exceptionally good looking car with manages to ooze class without being jarringly try-hard like a BMW or Mercedes. 


You’ll find more of the same on the inside. The dominant fixture is a large portrait touchscreen at the centre of the dashboard, with high level air vents and a simple row of buttons. It's delightfully minimal looking – like an IKEA wardrobe that you don't have to build – which means you'll forgive the fact that the small on-screen buttons are fiddly to use next to the layouts in one of the aforementioned Germans.


Changes on the inside are limited a new filtration system (originally intended for the smoggy climes of Beijing, China – so it works), a new Bowers & Wilkens stereo which is even better than excellent old system, wireless phone charging, oh and the 12V socket in the back seat has been replaced with two USB-C sockets.  


Materials have also been updated so you can have vegan-friendly leather, also know as vinyl, and choose from the more welcome addition of wool trim finishes. 


What hasn't changed is the huge amount of space for passengers both front and rear. The Volvo isn't a car that'll struggle to carry the family and the huge load area means there's also plenty of room for stuff. It is worth pointing out that the V90 doesn't have the largest boot in the class, but in real terms it is still vast and usable.


Something else the Volvo doesn't have is the wide range of engines offered in rivals, instead you're limited to a choice of four-cylinder units. Their small size lets them offer relatively good fuel economy that has been further improved  by the new mild-hybrid technology, which means the V90 gets a gentle electric boost when making off, can coast on the motorway and stop its engine before it comes to a complete halt. 


The engine range includes the mild-hybrid B4 (197PS), B5 (250PS) and B6 (300PS) petrols and mild-hybrid diesels also called B4 (197PS) and B5 (235PS) – both B5s are available with four-wheel drive.  The 340PS T6 breaks from the ranks by being a full-blown and pricy plug-in hybrid which has four-wheel drive as standard. 


Fancy something more rugged? Then have a read of our  Volvo V90 Cross Country review.


Whichever version you choose, the Volvo will never be as comfortable as a Mercedes E-Class Estate or as dynamic as a BMW 5 Series Touring, but it's a posh car you'll love spending time in without having to worry about being hated by everyone else around you. That might be enough to shove it into favour.  

Ready to get your top quality Volvo V90?

  • All cars come with a warranty
  • Selected dealers only
  • All quality checked

Volvo V90

2.0 T4 Inscription Plus 5dr Geartronic

  • 2020
  • 2,675 miles

Manufacturer Approved

  • Volvo Stoke
  • Staffordshire, ST16AT
Price:£26,000
PCP: £340.24/mo

Representative example: Contract Length: 37 months, 36 Monthly Payments: £340.24, Customer Deposit: £3,900.00, Total Deposit: £3,900.00, Optional Final Payment: £14,136.91, Total Charge For Credit: £4,285.55, Total Amount Payable: £30,285.55, Representative APR: 7.9%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 4.07%, Excess Mileage Charge: 14.9ppm, Mileage Per Annum: 10,000

Volvo V90

2.0 T4 R DESIGN Plus 5dr Geartronic

  • 2020
  • 88 miles

Manufacturer Approved

  • Stoneacre Volvo Chesterfield
  • Derbyshire, S419AJ
Price:£29,999
PCP: £527.69/mo

Representative example: Contract Length: 36 months, 35 Monthly Payments: £527.69, Customer Deposit: £4,499.00, Total Deposit: £4,499.85, Optional Final Payment: £13,378.29, Total Charge For Credit: £6,348.29, Total Amount Payable: £36,347.29, Representative APR: 11.3%, Interest Rate (Fixed): 5.81%, Excess Mileage Charge: 9.13ppm, Mileage Per Annum: 10,000

Is the Volvo V90 right for you?

If you’ve already made the decision to purchase a large estate car then the V90 should definitely be on your shortlist. It is a premium model with premium prices, so you can get the same or even more space for less money - Skoda’s Superb offers the best amount of space for the money - but if you fancy your wagon more luxurious than that then the V90 is worthy of consideration.


As a family machine it should be absolutely ideal, there’s enough room in the back to fit three kids across it without them sitting on top of each other, while the boot is capable of swallowing bulky pushchairs with ease. The V90 would also make for an excellent holiday vehicle or business wagon, effortlessly carrying heavy loads or bulky items on longer journeys. If you regularly plan on going into the city the hybrid model may hold extra appeal, although you may also want a car that’s not quite as big as this one.

What’s the best Volvo V90 model/engine to choose?

The B4 petrol (197PS) and B5 petrol (250PS) units are two of the cheaper options, and while they have decent performance they are also relatively thirsty. The D5 diesel engine offers 235PS and combined with four-wheel-drive as standard it provides effortless acceleration and isn’t much less economical than the cheaper but less powerful 190PS D4 unit. 


The 320PS petrol-electric hybrid is an impressive combination that offers the potential for great economy with strong performance, but if you don’t drive in town very much you won’t get any benefit - plus it is expensive in comparison with the other models.


As for trim levels, the entry level Momentum model is hardly starved of equipment, so it is not a bad choice - the only issue is that the engine range is more limited on this version. If you can stretch to it, the R-Design has a bigger range of engines and has a sharper exterior look as well as extra equipment.

What other cars are similar to the Volvo V90?

When you get to the large estate segment there aren’t quite as many contenders, but the usual suspects are present. BMW’s 5 Series Touring is a default choice for many buyers on account of its image and entertaining driving experience, while the Mercedes-Benz E-Class Estate is highly regarded for its comfort and luxury. Another key German rival is the Audi A6 Avant which combines good space efficiency with arguably the best cabin in the class, while Jaguar’s XF Sportbrake offers a first rate driving experience without all the fiddly tech.


If you head outside of the established premium brands, Volkswagen’s Passat Estate and Skoda’s Superb Estate share a lot of hardware beneath their skin but also offer up a great deal of space, good equipment levels and in the case of the Skoda at least, excellent value for money.

Learn more

Volvo V90 Front Interior

On the inside

Volvo V90 Rear View

Driving

Volvo V90 Right Side View

How much does it cost to run

Volvo V90 Front View

Prices, versions and specification